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Monday, May 08, 2017

MAXIMUM WEIGHT

People whose maximum BMI was 25-29.9 (overweight) were 6% more likely to die over 12 years

People whose maximum body mass index (BMI) over 16 years was in the overweight range (BMI of 25-29.9) were 6% more likely to die than people whose maximum BMI was in the normal range (BMI of 18.5–24.9) during an average follow-up of 12 years according to data from the Nurses’ Health Study I and II and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study which included 225,072 men and women.

However, when they only looked a person’s weight at the beginning of the study, being overweight (BMI of 25-29.9) was associated with a 4% lower risk of death during the 12 year follow-up.

However, when they included maximum BMI, they found an increased risk of death.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, May 08, 2017 12:46 pm | [0] comments

MAXIMUM WEIGHT

People whose maximum BMI was 30-34.9 (obese I) were 24% more likely to die over 12 years

People whose maximum body mass index (BMI) over 16 years was in the obese I range (BMI of 30-34.99) were 24% more likely to die than people whose maximum BMI was in the normal range (BMI of 18.5–24.9) during an average follow-up of 12 years according to data from the Nurses’ Health Study I and II and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study which included 225,072 men and women.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, May 08, 2017 12:37 pm | [0] comments

MAXIMUM WEIGHT

People whose maximum BMI was 35 or more (obese II) were 73% more likely to die over 12 years

People whose maximum body mass index (BMI) over 16 years was in the obese II range (BMI of 35 or more) were 73% more likely to die than people whose maximum BMI was in the normal range (BMI of 18.5–24.9) during an average follow-up of 12 years according to data from the Nurses’ Health Study I and II and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study which included 225,072 men and women.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, May 08, 2017 12:31 pm | [0] comments

Thursday, March 20, 2014

LONGEVITY AND BMI

BMI of 23 to 23.9 healthiest for those over 65, lowest risk of dying over 12 years

In people over 65-years-old, a body mass index (BMI) of 23 to 23.9 was associated with the lowest risk of dying over the next 12 years according to a review of 32 studies.

Being leaner than this was associated with a greater risk of dying.

  • Those with a BMI of 20 to 20.9 were 19% more likely to die over the next 12 years.
  • Those with a BMI of 21 to 21.9 were 12% more likely to die over the next 12 years.
  • Those with a BMI of 33 to 33.9 were 8% more likely to die over the next 12 years.

Not until a person weighed considerably more than this, was it associated with a greater risk of dying.

  • Those with a BMI of 33 to 33.9 were 8% more likely to die over the next 12 years.

“For older populations, being overweight was not found to be associated with an increased risk of mortality; however, there was an increased risk for those at the lower end of the recommended BMI range for adults,” the authors concluded.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Mar 20, 2014 2:45 pm | [0] comments

BMI & LONGEVITY

BMI of 20 to 20.9 associated with 19% greater risk of dying over 12 years for those over 65

In people over 65-years-old, a body mass index (BMI) of 23 to 23.9 was associated with the lowest risk of dying over the next 12 years according to a review of 32 studies.

Being leaner than this was associated with a greater risk of dying.

  • Those with a BMI of 20 to 20.9 were 19% more likely to die over the next 12 years.
  • Those with a BMI of 21 to 21.9 were 12% more likely to die over the next 12 years.
  • Those with a BMI of 33 to 33.9 were 8% more likely to die over the next 12 years.

Not until a person weighed considerably more than this, was it associated with a greater risk of dying.

  • Those with a BMI of 33 to 33.9 were 8% more likely to die over the next 12 years.

“For older populations, being overweight was not found to be associated with an increased risk of mortality; however, there was an increased risk for those at the lower end of the recommended BMI range for adults,” the authors concluded.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Mar 20, 2014 2:32 pm | [0] comments

BMI & LONGEVITY

BMI of 21 to 21.9 associated with 12% greater risk of dying over 12 years for those over 65

In people over 65-years-old, a body mass index (BMI) of 23 to 23.9 was associated with the lowest risk of dying over the next 12 years according to a review of 32 studies.

Being leaner than this was associated with a greater risk of dying.

  • Those with a BMI of 20 to 20.9 were 19% more likely to die over the next 12 years.
  • Those with a BMI of 21 to 21.9 were 12% more likely to die over the next 12 years.
  • Those with a BMI of 33 to 33.9 were 8% more likely to die over the next 12 years.

Not until a person weighed considerably more than this, was it associated with a greater risk of dying.

  • Those with a BMI of 33 to 33.9 were 8% more likely to die over the next 12 years.

“For older populations, being overweight was not found to be associated with an increased risk of mortality; however, there was an increased risk for those at the lower end of the recommended BMI range for adults,” the authors concluded.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Mar 20, 2014 2:24 pm | [0] comments

BMI & LONGEVITY

BMI of 33 to 33.9 associated with 8% greater risk of dying over 12 years for those over 65

In people over 65-years-old, a body mass index (BMI) of 23 to 23.9 was associated with the lowest risk of dying over the next 12 years according to a review of 32 studies.

Being leaner than this was associated with a greater risk of dying.

  • Those with a BMI of 20 to 20.9 were 19% more likely to die over the next 12 years.
  • Those with a BMI of 21 to 21.9 were 12% more likely to die over the next 12 years.
  • Those with a BMI of 33 to 33.9 were 8% more likely to die over the next 12 years.

Not until a person weighed considerably more than this, was it associated with a greater risk of dying.

  • Those with a BMI of 33 to 33.9 were 8% more likely to die over the next 12 years.

“For older populations, being overweight was not found to be associated with an increased risk of mortality; however, there was an increased risk for those at the lower end of the recommended BMI range for adults,” the authors concluded.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Mar 20, 2014 2:15 pm | [0] comments

Friday, April 02, 2004

What BMI is best a long life?

A body mass index of 22-23 in women and 24-25 in men is associated with the lowest mortality. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Apr 02, 2004 5:40 am | [0] comments
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