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Wednesday, August 01, 2018

STATINS & CANCER

Prolonged use of statins associated with a 23% increased risk of colorectal cancer

Prolonged use of statins for more than 4 years was associated with a 23% increased risk of colorectal cancer according to a recent analysis of data from 574 UK general practices from 1998-2008.

Prolonged use of atorvastatin (Lipitor) for more than 4 years was associated with a 51% increased risk of colorectal cancer.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Aug 01, 2018 8:47 am | [0] comments

Monday, May 28, 2018

STATINS & CANCER

People given a statin had 25% more new cancers

People given the statin, pravastatin (Pravachol), had 25% more cancer than those given a placebo in the PROSPER trial.

  • 65% more breast cancer
  • 46% more gastrointestinal cancer
  • 12% more respiratory cancer
  • 41% more other cancers
  • and they did not including non-melanoma skin cancer.
    (Previous studies have found that statins increase the risk of non-melanoma skin cancers.)

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, May 28, 2018 11:54 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, May 16, 2018

EXERCISE & CANCER

High levels of leisure-time physical activity associated with lower risk of 13 cancers

High levels of leisure-time physical activity were associated with a lower risk of 13 types of cancer when compared to people with low levels of leisure-time physical activity according to a study done by researchers at the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

The 13 cancers associated with a lower risk were:

  • 10% lower risk of breast cancer
  • 13% lower risk of bladder cancer
  • 13% lower risk of rectal cancer
  • 15% lower risk of head and neck cancer
  • 16% lower risk of colon cancer
  • 17% lower risk of multiple myeloma
  • 20% lower risk of myeloid leukemia
  • 21% lower risk of endometrial cancer
  • 22% lower risk of gastric cardia
  • 23% lower risk of kidney cancer
  • 26% lower risk of lung cancer
  • 27% lower risk of liver cancer
  • 42% lower risk of esophageal cancer

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, May 16, 2018 8:09 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, August 09, 2017

COFFEE

2 cup/day increase in coffee consumption associated w/ 3% fewer breast cancer deaths in non-smokers

Among non-smokers, a 2 cup/day increase in coffee consumption was associated with a:

  • 3% lower risk of dying from breast cancer
  • 3% lower risk of dying from colorectal cancer
  • 8% lower risk of dying from liver cancer

during a 30-year follow-up (1982-2012).

Among smokers and former-smokers, coffee consumption was associated with an increase in cancer deaths.

The study, done by the American Cancer Society, included 922,896 Cancer Prevention Study-II participants aged 28-94 years who completed a four-page questionnaire and were cancer free at baseline in 1982.

“These findings are consistent with many other studies that suggest coffee drinking is associated with a lower risk of colorectal, liver, female breast and head and neck cancer,” the authors of the study concluded.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Aug 09, 2017 6:26 pm | [0] comments

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

VEGETARIANISM

Vegetarians have a 22% lower risk of colorectal cancer than non-vegetarians

Vegetarians had a 22% lower risk of colorectal cancer during a 7.3 year follow-up compared to non-vegetarians according to a study from researchers at Loma Linda University in Loma Linda, California, USA.

There was a 19% lower risk of colon cancer and a 29% lower risk of rectal cancer in vegetarians versus non-vegetarians.

“Vegetarian diets are associated with an overall lower incidence of colorectal cancers,” the authors of the study concluded.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, Jan 10, 2017 11:42 am | [0] comments

VEGETARIANISM

Vegetarians who eat seafood and fish have a 43% lower risk of colorectal cancer than non-vegetarians

Pescovegetarians, that is vegetarians who also eat seafood and fish, had a 43% lower risk of colorectal cancer during a 7.3 year follow-up compared to non-vegetarians according to a study from researchers at Loma Linda University in Loma Linda, California, USA.

“Pescovegetarians in particular have a much lower risk [of colorectal cancer] compared with non vegetarians,” the authors of the study noted.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, Jan 10, 2017 11:31 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

CANCER SCREENING

Canadian Tast Force recommends against colonoscopy as screening test for colorectal cancer

“We recommend not using colonoscopy as a primary screening test for colorectal cancer,” according to the guideline recommendations on screening for colorectal cancer in primary care by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Instead, they recommend testing for small amounts of blood in the stool (fecal occult blood testing).

They also recommend against screening people 75 and older for colorectal cancer because studies have found that such screening does not reduce mortality from colon cancer.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Feb 24, 2016 9:40 am | [0] comments

Saturday, May 02, 2015

LUNG CANCER SCREENING

There is only one (1) medical screening test that has been shown to reduce overall death

“There is only one cancer screening test that has definitively been proven to help people live longer: lung cancer screening in heavy smokers,” writes Prof. H. Gilbert Welch, MD in his most recent book Less Medicine, More Health: 7 Assumptions That Drive Too Much Medical Care.

(It is from Chapter 3 / Assumption #3: Sooner Is Always Better: Disturbing truth: Early diagnosis can needlessly turn people into patients, under the section titled “Does Screening Save Lives?”)

“Why?

“Because heavy smokers face a twenty- to thirty-fold [20- to 30-fold] increased risk of lung cancer death.

“In other words, for heavy smokers, lung cancer is a big component of their overall death rate.”

To say this another way…

  • Breast cancer screening has not been shown to reduce the total risk of death over some number of years
  • Prostate cancer screening has not been been shown to reduce the total risk of death over some number of years
  • Colon cancer screening has not been been shown to reduce the total risk of death over some number of years
  • Oral cancer screening has not been been shown to reduce the total risk of death over some number of years
  • Screening for other cancers has not been been shown to reduce the total risk of death over some number of years

He started the chapter by saying, “THIS CHAPTER MAY CHALLENGE your assumptions about screening—specifically, cancer screening.”

Prof. H. Gilbert Welch, MD is also the author of the wonderful book Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick In Pursuit Of Health which is about the same topic as this book, the topic of over-diagnosis and over-treatment which does NOT help people live longer.

The reason that I feel passionately about this is because my mother suffered tragically from drug-induced side effects which her doctors were blind to.

It is along the same lines as Prof. Welch’s books which look at the effects of of over-diagnosis and over-treatment.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sat, May 02, 2015 4:06 pm | [0] comments

COLON CANCER SCREENING

Colon cancer screening (fecal occult blood screening) does NOT reduce death rate over 30 years

Screening for colon cancer (fecal occult-blood testing), either every year or every other year, did NOT reduce the total risk of death after a 30 year followup according to a recent analysis of the Minnesota Colon Cancer Control Study.

The percentage of people who had died from any cause after a 30-year follow-up was exactly the same in each group (71% of people had died in each group).

  • 71% of people had died in those screened for colon cancer every year for 11 years
  • 71% of people had died in those screened for colon cancer every other year, a total of 6 times
  • 71% of people had died in those who were NOT screened for colon cancer

Prof. H. Gilbert Welch, MD writes about this in his most recent book Less Medicine, More Health: 7 Assumptions That Drive Too Much Medical Care.

He is also the author of the wonderful book Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick In Pursuit Of Health which is about the same topic as this book, the topic of over-diagnosis and over-treatment which does NOT help people live longer.

The reason that I feel passionately about this is because my mother suffered tragically from drug-induced side effects which her doctors were blind to.

It is along the same lines as Prof. Welch’s books which look at the effects of of over-diagnosis and over-treatment.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sat, May 02, 2015 1:06 pm | [0] comments

Sunday, March 15, 2015

STATIN PROBLEMS

Long-term statin use is associated with a 23% increased risk of colorectal cancer

Long-term statin use (more than 4 years) is associated with a 23% increased risk of colorectal cancer according to a recent review paper titled The Ugly Side of Statins.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sun, Mar 15, 2015 2:43 pm | [0] comments

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

SUGAR / FRUCTOSE

Sugar can make some cancers grow including breast cancer and colon cancer says Lewis Cantley, PhD

Dr. Sanjay Gupta: If you limit your sugar you decrease your chances of developing cancer?


Lewis Cantley, PhD: Absolutely.


Cantley, a Harvard professor and the head of the Beth Israel Deaconess Cancer Center, says when we eat or drink sugar, it causes a sudden spike in the hormone insulin, which can serve as a catalyst to fuel certain types of cancers.


Lewis Cantley: What we're beginning to learn is that insulin can cause adverse effects in the various tissues. And of particular concern is cancer.


Why? Nearly a third of some common cancers -- including breast and colon cancers -- have something called insulin receptors on their surface. Insulin binds to these receptors and signals the tumor to start consuming glucose [which allows it to grow].


Lewis Cantley: Every cell in our body needs glucose to survive. But the trouble is, these cancer cells also use it to grow. So if you happen to have the tumor that has insulin receptors on it then it will get stimulated to take up the glucose that's in the bloodstream rather than go into fat or muscle, the glucose goes into the tumor. And the tumor uses it to grow.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, Apr 10, 2012 11:59 am | [0] comments

SUGAR / FRUCTOSE

Don’t eat sugar says cancer researcher, Lewis Cantley, PhD

Lewis Cantley's research team is working on developing drugs that will cut off the glucose supply to cancer cells and keep them from growing. But until there's a breakthrough, Cantley's advice? Don't eat sugar. And if you must, keep it to a minimum.


Cantley, a Harvard professor and the head of the Beth Israel Deaconess Cancer Center, says when we eat or drink sugar, it causes a sudden spike in the hormone insulin, which can serve as a catalyst to fuel certain types of cancers.


Lewis Cantley: What we're beginning to learn is that insulin can cause adverse effects in the various tissues. And of particular concern is cancer.


Why? Nearly a third of some common cancers -- including breast and colon cancers -- have something called insulin receptors on their surface. Insulin binds to these receptors and signals the tumor to start consuming glucose [which allows it to grow].


Lewis Cantley: Every cell in our body needs glucose to survive. But the trouble is, these cancer cells also use it to grow. So if you happen to have the tumor that has insulin receptors on it then it will get stimulated to take up the glucose that's in the bloodstream rather than go into fat or muscle, the glucose goes into the tumor. And the tumor uses it to grow.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, Apr 10, 2012 11:54 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

RECTAL CANCER

Women with the highest magnesium intake had a 55% lower risk of rectal cancer

The one-fifth of women with the highest magnesium intake -- more than 255 mg per day -- had a 55% lower risk of rectal cancer than the one-fifth of women with the lowest magnesium intake -- less than 209 mg per day -- according to a study from Sweden. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Mar 30, 2011 10:10 am | [0] comments

COLON CANCER

Women with the highest magnesium intake had a 34% lower risk of colon cancer

The one-fifth of women with the highest magnesium intake -- more than 255 mg per day -- had a 34% lower risk of colon cancer than the one-fifth of women with the lowest magnesium intake -- less than 209 mg per day -- according to a study from Sweden. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Mar 30, 2011 9:37 am | [0] comments

Monday, April 19, 2010

COLORECTAL CANCER

BMI of 23-24.9 increases risk of colorectal cancer by 14% vs those with a BMI of less than 23

A body mass index of 23 to 24.9 is associated with a 14% increase risk in colorectal cancer compared to those with a body mass index of less than 23 according to an analysis a 56 studies.

A BMI Table can be found here. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 19, 2010 12:19 pm | [0] comments

COLORECTAL CANCER

BMI of 25-27.4 increases risk of colorectal cancer by 19% vs those with a BMI of less than 23

A body mass index of 25 to 27.4 is associated with a 19% increase risk in colorectal cancer compared to those with a body mass index of less than 23 according to an analysis a 56 studies.

A BMI Table can be found here. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 19, 2010 12:10 pm | [0] comments

COLORECTAL CANCER

BMI of 27.5-29.9 increases risk of colorectal cancer by 24% vs those with a BMI of less than 23

A body mass index of 27.5 to 29.9 is associated with a 24% increase risk in colorectal cancer compared to those with a body mass index of less than 23 according to an analysis a 56 studies.

A BMI Table can be found here. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 19, 2010 12:01 pm | [0] comments

COLORECTAL CANCER

BMI of 30 or more increases risk of colorectal cancer by 41% vs those with a BMI of less than 23

A body mass index of 30 or more (which is the definition of obese) is associated with a 41% increase risk in colorectal cancer compared to those with a body mass index of less than 23 according to an analysis a 56 studies.

A BMI Table can be found here. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 19, 2010 11:52 am | [0] comments

COLORECTAL CANCER

For every 5 unit increase in BMI, the risk of colorectal cancer increases by 18%

For every 5 unit increase in body mass index (BMI), there is a 18% increased risk of colorectal cancer according to an analysis a 56 studies.

A BMI Table can be found here. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 19, 2010 10:52 am | [0] comments

COLORECTAL CANCER

In Asians, BMI of 23-24.9 increases risk of colorectal cancer by 21% vs a BMI of less than 23

In studies of Asian populations, a body mass index of 23 to 24.9 is associated with a 21% increase risk in colorectal cancer compared to those with a body mass index of less than 23 according to an analysis of 10 studies of Asian populations.

A BMI Table can be found here. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 19, 2010 10:41 am | [0] comments

COLORECTAL CANCER

In premenopausal women, BMI of 23-24.9 increases colorectal cancer risk 54% vs a BMI of less than 23

In premenopausal women, a body mass index of 23 to 24.9 is associated with a 54% increase risk in colorectal cancer compared to those with a body mass index of less than 23 according to an analysis a 56 studies.

A BMI Table can be found here. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 19, 2010 10:33 am | [0] comments

COLON CANCER

Colon cancer in men: Each 5 unit increase in BMI (35 lbs) associated with 26% greater risk

Each 5 unit increase in body mass index (BMI) is associated with a 26% increase in the risk of colon cancer for North American men according to an analysis of 26 studies on North American populations.

Five units of BMI is very roughly 35 pounds for a man of average height, and 30 pounds for a woman of average height.

A BMI Table can be found here. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 19, 2010 9:33 am | [0] comments

RECTAL CANCER

Rectal cancer in men: Each 5 unit increase in BMI (35 lbs) associated with 17% greater risk

Each 5 unit increase in body mass index (BMI) is associated with a 17% increase in the risk of rectal cancer for North American men according to an analysis of 26 studies on North American populations.

Five units of BMI is very roughly 35 pounds for a man of average height, and 30 pounds for a woman of average height.

A BMI Table can be found here. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 19, 2010 9:20 am | [0] comments

COLON CANCER

Colon cancer in women: Each 5 unit increase in BMI (35 lbs) associated with 12% greater risk

Each 5 unit increase in body mass index (BMI) is associated with a 12% increase in the risk of colon cancer for North American women according to an analysis of 26 studies on North American populations.

Five units of BMI is very roughly 30 pounds for a woman of average height, and 35 pounds for a man of average height.

A BMI Table can be found here. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 19, 2010 9:11 am | [0] comments

RECTAL CANCER

Rectal cancer in women: Each 5 unit increase in BMI (35 lbs) associated with 4% greater risk

Each 5 unit increase in body mass index (BMI) is associated with a 4% increase in the risk of rectal cancer for North American women according to an analysis of 26 studies on North American populations.

Five units of BMI is very roughly 30 pounds for a woman of average height, and 35 pounds for a man of average height.

A BMI Table can be found here. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 19, 2010 9:05 am | [0] comments

COLON CANCER

Colon cancer in men: Being obese is associated with 60% greater risk vs BMI less than 23

Being obese, that is having in body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more, is associated with a 60% increase in the risk of colon cancer men compared to those with a BMI of less than 23 (lean) according to an analysis of 56 studies.

A BMI Table can be found here. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 19, 2010 9:02 am | [0] comments

RECTAL CANCER

Rectal cancer in men: Being obese is associated with 30% greater risk vs BMI less than 23

Being obese, that is having in body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more, is associated with a 30% increase in the risk of rectal cancer men compared to those with a BMI of less than 23 (lean) according to an analysis of 56 studies.

A BMI Table can be found here. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 19, 2010 8:58 am | [0] comments

COLON CANCER

Colon cancer in women: Being obese is associated with 25% greater risk vs BMI less than 23

Being obese, that is having in body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more, is associated with a 25% increase in the risk of colon cancer women compared to those with a BMI of less than 23 (lean) according to an analysis of 56 studies.

A BMI Table can be found here. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 19, 2010 8:55 am | [0] comments

RECTAL CANCER

Rectal cancer in women: Being obese is associated with 14% greater risk vs BMI less than 23

Being obese, that is having in body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more, is associated with a 14% increase in the risk of rectal cancer women compared to those with a BMI of less than 23 (lean) according to an analysis of 56 studies.

Five units of BMI is very roughly 30 pounds for a woman of average height, and 35 pounds for a man of average height.

A BMI Table can be found here. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 19, 2010 8:52 am | [0] comments

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

GLYCEMIC LOAD

High glycemic index diet increases the risk of colorectal cancer 26 percent

The one-fourth of people eating a diet with the highest glycemic index or highest glycemic load were 26 percent more likely to develop colorectal cancer compared to the one-fourth eating a diet with the lowest glycemic load. This according to an analysis of 39 studies. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, Sep 30, 2008 1:20 pm | [0] comments

Friday, September 12, 2008

COLON CANCER

10 lbs weight gain every 10 years since age 21 increases risk of colon cancer 33% in men

The risk of colon cancer was 33 percent greater in men 40- to 75-years-old who had gained 10 pounds for every 10 years since the age of 21 according to a study from Walter Willett at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts, USA and others.

A weight gain of 10 pounds in the previous 2-4 years increased the risk 14 percent. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Sep 12, 2008 7:00 am | [0] comments

COLON CANCER

30% of all cases of colon cancer in men attributable to BMI above 22.5

Nearly one-third (29.5 percent) of all cases of colon cancer in men 40- to 75-years-old were attributable to a body mass index (BMI) above 22.5 (lean) according to a study from Walter Willett at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts, USA and others.

"Our results add support that overweight and obesity are modifiable risk factors for colon cancer among men and suggest that weight has an important influence on colon cancer risk even in later life," the researchers concluded.
Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Sep 12, 2008 6:54 am | [0] comments

Monday, May 26, 2008

BOWEL CANCER

Bowel cancer risk 18% lower in people with BMI of 20 (low normal) compared to 25 (high normal)

A person with a body mass index (BMI) of 20 -- low normal -- is 18 percent less likely to get bowel cancer than a person with a BMI of 25 -- high normal -- according to a study from the World Cancer Research Fund as reported by the British newspaper the Telegraph. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, May 26, 2008 2:56 pm | [0] comments

Tuesday, January 15, 2008

COLON CANCER

Obesity involved in 10% of colon cancers

Obesity is involved in 10 percent of cases of colon cancer notes the report Storing Up Problems: The Medical Case for a Slimmer Nation by the Royal College of Physicians. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, Jan 15, 2008 8:20 am | [0] comments

Thursday, November 08, 2007

COLORECTAL CANCER

Colorectal cancer: 60 lbs increases risk 1.6-fold in postmenopausal women

A difference of about 60 pounds increases the risk of colorectal cancer 1.6-fold in postmenopausal women according to a study from the University of Oxford in Oxford, England. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Nov 08, 2007 6:31 am | [0] comments

Monday, September 17, 2007

COLORECTAL CANCER

Colorectal cancer 1.8 times more likely in obese men, 2.3 times more likely in tall women

Obese men are 80 percent more likely to get colorectal cancer than normal weight men according to a study of men and women in Ontario and Newfoundland, Canada. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Sep 17, 2007 10:36 am | [0] comments

Monday, September 10, 2007

COLON CANCER

30-35 lbs increase in body weight increases the risk of colon cancer by 30% in men, 12% in women

An increase of 5 units in body mass index (BMI), which is roughly 30 pounds for a woman of average height and 35 pounds for a man of average height, increases the risk of colon cancer 30 percent in men and 12 percent in women according to an analysis by researchers from Sweden. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Sep 10, 2007 7:50 am | [0] comments

RECTAL CANCER

30-35 lbs increase in body weight increases the risk of rectal cancer by 12% in men, 3% in women

An increase of 5 units in body mass index (BMI), which is roughly 30 pounds for a woman of average height and 35 pounds for a man of average height, increases the risk of rectal cancer 12 percent in men and 3 percent in women according to an analysis by researchers from Sweden. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Sep 10, 2007 7:44 am | [0] comments

COLON AND RECTAL CANCER

An hour of leisure time physical activity per day reduces risk of colon and rectal cancer by 41-44%

Men who get an hour of leisure-time physical activity per day are 44 percent less likely to get colon cancer and 41 percent less likely to get rectal cancer than men who get less than 10 minutes of leisure-time exercise per day according to study by researchers from Sweden. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Sep 10, 2007 7:33 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, March 21, 2007

COLON CANCER

Exercise and being thin reduce the risk of colon cancer in women

Women with a body mass index (BMI) of 29 -- almost obese -- are 45 percent more likely to get colon cancer than thin women with a BMI of 21 or less according to a study from the Harvard School of Public Health. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Mar 21, 2007 2:30 am | [0] comments

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