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Thursday, June 23, 2011

FOODS ASSOCIATED WITH WEIGHT GAIN

Each daily serving of sugar-sweetened beverages associated with one lbs weight gain over 4 years

Each daily serving of sugar-sweetened beverages was associated with a weight gain of 1.0 pounds over 4 years according to a study by Harvard researchers. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jun 23, 2011 9:04 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

LIQUID CALORIES

Liquid calories do not decrease appetite

Liquid calories, such as in soft drinks, do not decrease appetite the way that solid calories do according to a recent study from Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. Since soda consumption has increased at least 40 percent since the late 1970's, this may help partially explain the rapid rise in obesity. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Oct 27, 2010 8:02 am | [0] comments

Thursday, June 24, 2010

FAST FOOD

Fast food and sodas may help explain the increase in childhood obesity

As of 1996, children were getting three times as much of their food from restaurants and fast food outlets as they were in 1977 according to the paper. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jun 24, 2010 8:43 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, June 16, 2010

SUGAR VS ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS

Sugar-sweetened soda causes weight gain of 3.5 lbs vs weight loss of 2.2 lbs w/ artificial sweetener

Overweight men and women gained an average of 3.5 pounds in two-and-a-half months drinking sugar-sweetened soda compared to an average weight loss of 2.2 pounds for those drinking artificially-sweetened sodas according to a recent study. This is a difference of 5.7 pounds between the groups Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Jun 16, 2010 9:54 am | [2] comments

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

SUGARY BEVERAGES

Each additional serving of sugar-sweetened drink increases risk of obesity in 12-year-olds by 60%

Among children who were about 12-years-old, each additional serving of sugar-sweetened drink increased the risk of obesity by 60 percent, and increased body mass index (BMI) by 0.24 units according to a study by David Ludwig and others at Harvard University.

This was after adjusting for differences in height, diet, lifestyle and demographics. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, Sep 29, 2009 10:30 am | [0] comments

Monday, September 28, 2009

SODA

One soda per day increases risk of overweight in adults by 27%, UCLA study found

"[A]dults who drink a soda or more per day are 27 percent more likely to be overweight than those who do not drink sodas, regardless of income or ethnicity," according to a a report from researchers from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and the California Center for Public Health Advocacy.

The results were based on more than 40,000 interviews conducted by the California Health Interview Surveys. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 2:16 pm | [0] comments

HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

Consumption of consumption of high-fructose corn syrup increased 10-fold between 1970 and 1990

"The consumption of HFCS increased > 1000% [10-fold] between 1970 and 1990, far exceeding the changes in intake of any other food or food group," according to a paper by obesity researcher George Bray and others. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 1:25 pm | [0] comments

SUGAR

Americans consume 355 calories per day as added sugar, notes American Heart Association


"In 2001 to 2004, the usual intake of added sugars for Americans was 22.2 teaspoons per day (355 calories per day)," according to a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 1:25 pm | [0] comments

HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

The average American consumes 132 calories of high-fructose corn syrup per day

According to their "most conservative estimate", the average American older than 2-years-old consume 132 calories as high-fructose corn syrup according to a paper by obesity researcher George Bray and others. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 1:19 pm | [0] comments

HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

The top one-fifth of Americans consumes 316 calories of high-fructose corn syrup per day

The one-fifth of Americans 2-years or older who consume the most caloric sweeteners ingest an average of 316 calories per day according to a paper by obesity researcher George Bray and others. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 1:04 pm | [0] comments

HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

Fructose does not stimulate insulin secretion or enhance leptin production like glucose does

"The digestion, absorption, and metabolism of fructose differ from those of glucose," notes a paper by obesity researcher George Bray and others.

[LIver] metabolism of fructose favors de novo lipogenesis [that is, the conversion of carbohydrates to fat].

"In addition, unlike glucose, fructose does not stimulate insulin secretion or enhance leptin production," they note.

"Because insulin and leptin act as key afferent signals in the regulation of food intake and body weight, this suggests that dietary fructose may contribute to increased energy intake and weight gain."

Comment: A recent study also found that fructose increases appetite, whereas glucose decreases appetite.

This is because fructose metabolism requires an enzyme that depletes ATP, the universal energy molecule, whereas, glucose increases ATP. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 12:51 pm | [0] comments

HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

Average soda size is 2.5 times larger today than in the 1950’s, 16 oz vs 6.5 oz

The average side soda sold today (2009) compared to those sold in the 1950s is 2.5 times larger -- 16 ounces versus 6.5 ounces -- according to a a report from researchers from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and the California Center for Public Health Advocacy. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 12:44 pm | [0] comments

HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

Two-thirds (66%) of all high fructose corn syrup consumed in the United States is through beverages

Two-thirds (66%) of all high fructose corn syrup consumed in the United States is through beverages according to a paper by obesity researcher George Bray and others.
Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 12:40 pm | [0] comments

HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

Calories from milk reduced 38% in the US from 1977 to 2001

Between 1977-78 and 1999-2001, "Overall, energy intake from [milk] was reduced by 38%," according to a paper by researcher at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 12:36 pm | [0] comments

HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

Calories from sweetened beverages increased 2.4 fold from 1977 to 2001

Between 1977-78 and 1999-2001, "Overall, energy intake from sweetened beverages increased 135% [2.4-fold]," according to a paper by researcher at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 12:36 pm | [0] comments

SUGARY BEVERAGES

Calories from sweetened beverages plus milk increased calories by 278 per day from 1977 to 2001

Between 1977-78 and 1999-2001, "Overall, energy intake from sweetened beverages [including a 38% reduction in calories from milk resulted in]... a 278 total calorie increase," according to a paper by researcher at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 12:29 pm | [0] comments

Monday, April 06, 2009

Eliminating one sugar-sweetened drink per day caused a weight loss of 1.1 pounds after six months, .

Eliminating one sugar-sweetened drink per day caused a weight loss of 1.1 pounds after six months, and 1.4 pounds after a year-and-a-half according to a new study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 06, 2009 1:49 pm | [0] comments

Thursday, April 02, 2009

SODAS

One sugar-sweetened beverage per day increases the risk of heart attacks in women by 23%

Consuming one sugar-sweetened beverage per day increases the risk of a heart attack in women over a 24-year period by 23 percent according to the Nurse's Health Study. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Apr 02, 2009 5:02 pm | [0] comments

Thursday, September 18, 2008

BEVERAGES

Fluid intake in US increased from 79 fluid ounces in 1989 to 100 fluid ounces in 2002

U.S. adults increased fluid intake from 79 fluid ounces to 100 fluid ounces, however, water consumption only increased from 43 fluid ounces to 45 fluid ounces according to a paper from according to a paper by Barry M. Popkin and Kiyah J. Duffey from the Department of Nutrition at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Sep 18, 2008 8:07 am | [0] comments

BEVERAGES

From 1965 to 2002, US adults consumed 108 calories from soda, 73 more calories from alcohol

Changes in calorie intake from beverages from 1965 to 2002 among U.S. adults are as follows:
  • 108 more calories per day from soda

  • 73 more calories per day from alcohol

  • 25 more calories per day from fruit drinks

  • 19 more calories per day from fruit juice

  • 19 more calories per day from low-fat milk

  • 51 fewer calories per day from whole milk
according to a paper from according to a paper by Barry M. Popkin and Kiyah J. Duffey from the Department of Nutrition at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

"Overall, per capita consumption of caloric-beverage-containing-nutrients increased by 45 calories, due to significant increases in alcohol..." the paper noted.

"[A]nd all calorically-sweetened-beverages (soda, fruit drinks, sweetened tea, sweetened coffee, and other sweetened beverages) increased by 153 calories." Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Sep 18, 2008 7:59 am | [0] comments

BEVERAGES

In 2002, 30% of US adults consumed one-fourth of calories from beverages vs 17% in 1965

In 1965, 17% of adults in the U.S. consumed 25 percent of their daily calories from beverages according to a paper from according to a paper by Barry M. Popkin and Kiyah J. Duffey from the Department of Nutrition at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

By 1989, 37 percent of the population was consuming a one-fourth of their calories from beverages.

By 2002, this dropped to 30 percent.


Calorie intake in the U.S. increased from 1993 calories per day in 1965 to 2185 calories per day in 2002 according to a paper by Barry M. Popkin and Kiyah J. Duffey from the Department of Nutrition at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Sep 18, 2008 7:55 am | [0] comments

BEVERAGES

Calories from beverages increased from 236 calories in 1965 to 458 calories in 2002

Calorie intake from beverages per capita in the U.S. increased from 236 calories per day in 1965 to 458 calories per day in 2002 according to a paper by Barry M. Popkin and Kiyah J. Duffey from the Department of Nutrition at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Sep 18, 2008 7:49 am | [0] comments

BEVERAGES

Percent of calories from beverages nearly doubled from 1965 to 2002 from 11.8% to 21%

The percentage of calories from beverages among Americans nearly doubled from 1965 to 2002 as follows:
  • 11.8% in 1965

  • 14.2% in 1977

  • 18.5% in 1988

  • 21.0% in 2002
according to a paper by Barry M. Popkin and Kiyah J. Duffey from the Department of Nutrition at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Sep 18, 2008 6:49 am | [0] comments

Roughly half of increase in calorie consumption from calorically sweetened beverages such as soda

Calorie consumption in the U.S. has increased in the past decade. It has been estimated that roughly half of the increase in calories is from calorically sweetened beverages such as soda according to a 2002 paper (Nielsen et al, 2002). Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Sep 18, 2008 6:41 am | [0] comments

SUGARY BEVERAGES

Only 7-15% of sugar-sweetened beverages in the US consumed at school

"On a typical weekday, 55% to 70% of all sugar-sweetened beverage calories were consumed in the home environment, and 7% to 15% occurred in schools according to a paper by researchers from Columbia University in New York, USA.

"Schools are a limited source for sugar-sweetened beverages, suggesting that initiatives to restrict sugar-sweetened beverage sales in schools may have an only marginal impact on overall consumption," the authors of the paper concluded.
Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Sep 18, 2008 5:39 am | [0] comments

SUGARY BEVERAGES

Calories from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juice: 242 calories in 1994, 270 in 2004

The average number of calories consumed in the U.S. per capita from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100 percent fruit juice increased from 242 calories per day in 1988-1994 to 270 calories per day in 1999-2004 according to a paper by researchers from Columbia University in New York, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Sep 18, 2008 5:19 am | [0] comments

SUGARY BEVERAGES

Calories from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juice in 2-5 year-olds in US: 176 calories

In 1999-2004, U.S. children 2- to 5-years-old consumed an average of 176 calories from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100 percent fruit juice according to a paper by researchers from Columbia University in New York, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Sep 18, 2008 5:15 am | [0] comments

SUGARY BEVERAGES

Calories from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juice in 6-11 year-olds in US: 229 calories

In 1999-2004, U.S. children 6- to 11-years-old consumed an average of 229 calories from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100 percent fruit juice according to a paper by researchers from Columbia University in New York, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Sep 18, 2008 5:11 am | [0] comments

SUGARY BEVERAGES

Calories from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juice in 12-19 year-olds in US: 356 calories

In 1999-2004, U.S. children 12- to 19-years-old consumed an average of 356 calories from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100 percent fruit juice according to a paper by researchers from Columbia University in New York, USA.

"Children and adolescents today derive 10% to 15% of total calories from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juice," the authors of the paper concluded. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Sep 18, 2008 5:06 am | [0] comments

Thursday, August 21, 2008

SODA

Soda consumption among U.S. children 6-11 increased 137 percent from 1977 to 2001

Soda consumption among U.S. children, 6- to 11-years-old, increased by 137 percent -- that is, it increased 2.4-fold -- from 1977 to 2001 according to a report titled F as in Fat: How Obesity Policies Are Failing in America, 2008 from the Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Aug 21, 2008 8:03 am | [0] comments

Monday, July 14, 2008

SUCROSE

High sucrose intake, mostly as sugary sodas, causes weight gain of 3.5 lbs in 2.5 months

Overweight men and women fed a high-sucrose diet, mostly as sugary soft drinks, containing an average of 28 percent of their calories as sucrose (152 grams or 608 calories) gained 3.5 pounds in two-and-a-half months compared to weight loss of 2.2 pounds for those given the artificial sweetener aspartame (NutraSweet) according to a study by Arnie Astrup and colleagues from The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University in Frederiksberg, Denmark.

The high-sucrose group increased their calorie intake by an average of 382 calories by the end of the study. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Jul 14, 2008 3:24 pm | [0] comments

LIQUID CALORIES

Women consume 104 more calories at a meal when given cola, orange juice or milk

Women consumed an average of 104 more calories at a meal when they were given a caloric beverage containing 156 calories to drink with the meal of either cola, orange juice or low-fat milk containing 1 percent fat than when they were given a non-caloric beverage of either a diet soda, water or no beverage according to a study by Barbara Rolls and colleagues at Pennsylvania State University in University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.

In other words, liquid calories tend not to reduce calorie intake the way that solid food does. This has been shown in numerous other studies as well.

Comment: The best weight loss doctor I know tells his patients, "No liquid calories." Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Jul 14, 2008 3:08 pm | [0] comments

Thursday, June 05, 2008

SODA

Black college students consume 2X as many calories from sugary drinks as whites: 796 vs 396 calories

Black college students consume twice as many calories from sugar-sweetened beverages as white students according to a study from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock, Arkansas, USA. Black students consumed an average of 796 calories per day from sugar-sweetened beverages compared to 396 calories per day for white students. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jun 05, 2008 8:31 am | [0] comments

SODA

4.5-year-old children who consume sugar-sweetened beverages are twice as likely to be overweight

Children who consume sugar-sweetened beverages four to six times per week are more than twice as likely ( 15.4 percent versus 6.9 percent ) to be overweight at the age of 4.5-years-old as children who do not consume sugar-sweetened beverages according to a study by researchers from University of Ottawa in Ontario, Canada. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jun 05, 2008 8:14 am | [0] comments

SODA

Each additional serving of sugary drink per day increased the risk of obesity in 12-year-olds by 60%

Each additional serving of sugar-sweetened beverages increased the risk of obesity in 12-year-old children by 60 percent according to a recent study by researchers from Harvard University in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jun 05, 2008 7:52 am | [0] comments

SODA

Children who consume at least one 9 ounce soda per day consume 10% more calories

Children who consume at least one 9 ounce soda per day consume, on average, 10 percent more calories than children who not drink soda according to a 1999 study.

For example, the average calorie intake for school-aged children who drank an average of 9 ounce or more of soda per day was 2018 calories compared to 1,830 calories for children who did not consume sodas. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jun 05, 2008 7:31 am | [0] comments

SODAS AND FRUIT JUICE

Children and adolescents get 7-13% of total calories from sodas and fruit juice

In 1999–2004, the average calorie intake from sugar-sweetened beverages was:
  • 124 calories or 7 percent of calories for children 2-5 years-old, an increase of 17 calories from 1988-1994

  • 184 calories or 9 percent of calories for children 6-11 years-old, an increase of 31 calories from 1988-1994

  • 301 calories or 13 percent of calories for children 12-19 years-old, an increase of 24 calories from 1988-1994.
Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jun 05, 2008 6:30 am | [0] comments

SODAS AND FRUIT JUICE

Percent of total calories from sugary beverages doubled from 1977 to 2001 from 4.8% to 10.3%

From 1977–1978 to 1999–2001, the percentage of total calorie intake from sugar-sweetened beverages among children 2- to 18-years-old more than doubled, from 4.8% to 10.3% according to a recent study.
Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jun 05, 2008 6:22 am | [0] comments

SODAS AND FRUIT JUICE

Preschool children who consume one or more sweet drinks per day are twice as likely to be overweight

Preschool children in who consumed one or more sweet drinks, which included soda, juices and fruit drinks, were twice as likely to be overweight as children who consumed less than one of these drinks per day according to a recent study of low-income preschool children in Missouri, USA.

Those who consumed 3 or more sweet drinks per day were not more likely to be overweight than those consuming 1-2 sweet drinks per day. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jun 05, 2008 6:04 am | [0] comments

Friday, February 29, 2008

SWEETENED BEVERAGES

Replacing sweetened beverages with water reduces calorie intake by 200 calories per day

Women who replaced all sweetened caloric beverages with water, reduced their calorie intake by an average of 200 calories per day according to a new study. This effect was sustained for at least a year, and probably indefinitely. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Feb 29, 2008 9:13 am | [0] comments

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