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Wednesday, June 20, 2012

SKINNY ON OBESITY VIDEO SERIES

Stress causes the same signals as famine and makes us crave dense calories notes Elissa Epel

"Stress causes the same signals that famine does. Stress makes us hungry. Stress turns on the brain pathway that make us crave dense calories," notes Elissa Epel from the Center for Obesity Assessment, Study and Treatment, University of California, San Francisco in the 7-part video series called “The Skinny on Obesity” (Episode 6). Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Jun 20, 2012 10:13 am | [0] comments

SKINNY ON OBESITY VIDEO SERIES

Stress makes us crave high-fat, high-sweet, high-salt foods notes Elissa Epel

"[W]hen we are stressed, we tend to choose less healthy choices, high-fat, high-sweet food… or high-salt, and it is those 3 that rewards the brain, and to a stressed brain, they are even more rewarding," notes Elissa Epel from the Center for Obesity Assessment, Study and Treatment, University of California, San Francisco in the 7-part video series called “The Skinny on Obesity” (Episode 6). Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Jun 20, 2012 10:00 am | [0] comments

SKINNY ON OBESITY VIDEO SERIES

Reducing stress and reducing cortisol, reduced belly fat notes Elissa Epel

A study that helped people reduce stress, reduced belly fat notes Elissa Epel from the Center for Obesity Assessment, Study and Treatment, University of California, San Francisco in the 7-part video series called “The Skinny on Obesity” (Episode 6).

The program they followed is described below.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Jun 20, 2012 9:30 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

JOB STRESS

Women with more job stress gained 2.4 lbs more than women with lower job stress

Women who were predisposed to obesity and had high job demands but a low amount of influence at work gained 2.4 pounds more in six years than similar women with lower job demands according to a study from Denmark. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Sep 29, 2010 9:56 am | [0] comments

CORTISOL

Chronic stress or diet-induced obesity is rarely associated with excess cortisol levels

There are a number of nutritional supplements being sold for weight loss which claim that excess belly fat is caused by elevated levels of the stress hormone cortisol, and their product will help you lose belly fat by reducing cortisol levels. This may be nonsense in the overwhelming majority of cases because "chronic stress or [diet-induced obesity] is rarely associated with [excess cortisol levels]" according to a recent paper about stress and obesity. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Sep 29, 2010 8:19 am | [0] comments

STRESS & FRUCTOSE

Stress and high-fat, high-sugar diet decreases stimulation of fat-burning adrenaline receptors

Chronic stress and a high-fat, high-sugar diet decrease stimulation adrenaline receptors involved in burning fat and reducing appetite notes a recent paper. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Sep 29, 2010 7:34 am | [0] comments

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

STRESS-INDUCED WEIGHT GAIN

Stress increases diet-induced abdominal obesity

"Stress exaggerates diet-induced obesity" which increases belly fat according to a study by researchers from Georgetown University Medical Center.

Animals who were under daily stress and fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet gained about twice as much belly fat as mice who were fed the same diet but were not under stress. Giving a drug which blocked neuropeptide Y2R receptors which are involved in this process reduced abdominal fat by 40 to 50 percent. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, Sep 28, 2010 7:11 am | [1] comments

Monday, September 27, 2010

5-HTP

5-HTP decreases food intake in stressed rats and those deprived of food

5-Hydroxy-L-tyrptophan (5-HTP) dose-dependently decreased food intake in rats deprived of food, and in rats that were stressed according to a study by Richard Wurtman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Tim Maher from the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences in Boston, Mass. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Sep 27, 2010 6:25 am | [0] comments

Tuesday, May 27, 2008

PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS

The perception of being overweight increases likelihood of psychological distress 40-50%

People who perceive themselves as being overweight are 40 percent more likely to experience medium psychological distress, and 50 percent more likely to experience high psychological distress according to a study from researchers at the University of Sydney in Sydney, Australia. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, May 27, 2008 8:29 am | [0] comments

Monday, April 11, 2005

LEPTIN

Stress may decrease leptin’s weight-reducing effect

Stress hormones may increase weight by interfering with the effects of leptin according to a recent study. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 11, 2005 6:55 am | [0] comments
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