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Friday, June 11, 2010

FAT VS CALORIE INTAKE

People consume 270 more calories when eating a meal with 38% fat vs 24% fat

The more fat a meal contains, the more calories people eat. This according to a study from researchers at University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver, Colorado, USA.

When people consumed a diet containing 23.8 percent fat, they consumed an average of 2748 calories per day.

When they consumed a diet containing 32.7 percent fat, they consumed an additional 235 calories for an average of 2748 calories per day.

When they consumed a diet containing 38.1 percent fat, they consumed an additional 270 calories for an average of 3018 calories per day.

"These results show that energy intake increases as dietary fat content increases across the usual range of dietary fat consumed in the United States," the researcher concluded.

"Even small reductions in dietary fat could help in lowering total energy intake and reducing weight gain in the population." Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Fri, Jun 11, 2010 10:01 am | [0] comments

Monday, September 22, 2008

SMALL CHANGES

Weight gain can be prevented in 90% of adults with 100 calories per day

"Researchers have found that weight gain can be prevented among 90 percent of adults by modifying energy balance by just 100 calories a day. That means eating 100 fewer calories a day -- about a tablespoon of butter or less than a can of soda -- and burning 100 more calories every day, which is about 15 minutes of walking or 2,000 more steps," according to an article by James O. Hill, Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine at the University of Colorado Denver in Denver, Colorado, USA.

"Dr. Hill also serves as the Director of the Center for Human Nutrition, a nutrition center funded by the National Institutes of Health" according to his bio.

"Dr. Hill is co-founder of America on the Move, a national weight gain prevention initiative that aims to inspire Americans to make small changes in how much they eat and how much they move to prevent weight gain.

"Dr. Hill established The Colorado Weigh, a behavioral weight management program that is offered to the public.
"He is the author of the Step Diet Book, published in June 2004." Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Sep 22, 2008 8:47 am | [0] comments

Thursday, September 18, 2008

BEVERAGES

From 1965 to 2002, US adults consumed 108 calories from soda, 73 more calories from alcohol

Changes in calorie intake from beverages from 1965 to 2002 among U.S. adults are as follows:
  • 108 more calories per day from soda

  • 73 more calories per day from alcohol

  • 25 more calories per day from fruit drinks

  • 19 more calories per day from fruit juice

  • 19 more calories per day from low-fat milk

  • 51 fewer calories per day from whole milk
according to a paper from according to a paper by Barry M. Popkin and Kiyah J. Duffey from the Department of Nutrition at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

"Overall, per capita consumption of caloric-beverage-containing-nutrients increased by 45 calories, due to significant increases in alcohol..." the paper noted.

"[A]nd all calorically-sweetened-beverages (soda, fruit drinks, sweetened tea, sweetened coffee, and other sweetened beverages) increased by 153 calories." Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Thu, Sep 18, 2008 7:59 am | [0] comments

BEVERAGES

In 2002, 30% of US adults consumed one-fourth of calories from beverages vs 17% in 1965

In 1965, 17% of adults in the U.S. consumed 25 percent of their daily calories from beverages according to a paper from according to a paper by Barry M. Popkin and Kiyah J. Duffey from the Department of Nutrition at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

By 1989, 37 percent of the population was consuming a one-fourth of their calories from beverages.

By 2002, this dropped to 30 percent.


Calorie intake in the U.S. increased from 1993 calories per day in 1965 to 2185 calories per day in 2002 according to a paper by Barry M. Popkin and Kiyah J. Duffey from the Department of Nutrition at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Thu, Sep 18, 2008 7:55 am | [0] comments

CALORIE INTAKE IN U.S.

Calories intake in the US increased from 1993 calories in 1965 to 2185 calories in 2002

Calorie intake in the U.S. increased from 1993 calories per day in 1965 to 2185 calories per day in 2002 according to a paper by Barry M. Popkin and Kiyah J. Duffey from the Department of Nutrition at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Thu, Sep 18, 2008 6:44 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, August 20, 2008

CALORIE INTAKE

U.S. men consumed 6% more carbohydrates in 1999-2000 than 1971-1974

U.S. men, 20 to 74, increased their percent of calories as carbohydrates from 42.4 percent in 1971-1974 to 49 percent in 1999-2000 according to 2004 report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Aug 20, 2008 9:50 am | [0] comments

CALORIE INTAKE

U.S. women consumed 6% more carbohydrates in 1999-2000 than 1971-1974

U.S. women, 20 to 74, increased their percent of calories as carbohydrates from 45.4 percent in 1971-1974 to 51.6 percent in 1999-2000 according to 2004 report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Aug 20, 2008 9:44 am | [0] comments

CALORIE INTAKE

U.S. men consumed 4% less fat in 1999-2000 than 1971-1974

U.S. men, 20 to 74, decreased their percent of calories as fat from 36.9 percent in 1971-1974 to 32.8 percent in 1999-2000 according to 2004 report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Aug 20, 2008 9:39 am | [0] comments

CALORIE INTAKE

U.S. women consumed 4% less fat in 1999-2000 than 1971-1974

U.S. women, 20 to 74, decreased their percent of calories as fat from 36.1 percent in 1971-1974 to 32.8 percent in 1999-2000 according to 2004 report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Aug 20, 2008 9:33 am | [0] comments

CALORIE INTAKE

U.S. men consumed 1% less protein in 1999-2000 than 1971-1974

U.S. men, 20 to 74, decreased their percent of calories as protein from 16.5 percent in 1971-1974 to 15.5 percent in 1999-2000 according to 2004 report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Aug 20, 2008 9:29 am | [0] comments

CALORIE INTAKE

U.S. women consumed 2% less protein in 1999-2000 than 1971-1974

U.S. women, 20 to 74, decreased their percent of calories as protein from 16.9 percent in 1971-1974 to 15.1 percent in 1999-2000 according to 2004 report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Aug 20, 2008 9:25 am | [0] comments

CALORIE INTAKE

U.S. Women consumed 22% more calories in 1999-2000 than 1971-1974

U.S. women, 20 to 74, consumed 22 percent more calories in 1999-2000 than in 1971-1974, increasing their intake from 1542 calories to 1877 calories according to a report titled F as in Fat: How Obesity Policies Are Failing in America, 2008 from the Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Aug 20, 2008 8:40 am | [0] comments

CALORIE INTAKE

U.S. men consumed 7% more calories in 1999-2000 than 1971-1974

U.S. men, 20 to 74, consumed 7 percent more calories in 1999-2000 than in 1971-1974, increasing their intake from 1450 calories to 2618 calories according to a report titled F as in Fat: How Obesity Policies Are Failing in America, 2008 from the Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Aug 20, 2008 8:38 am | [0] comments

Friday, June 08, 2007

BEVERAGES

Women consumed 10% more calories, men 26% more, when served 18 oz vs 12 oz drink

When men and women were served a larger beverage at lunch, they consumed more calories from the beverage without reducing their food intake according to a recent study from researchers at Pennsylvania State University in University Park, Pennsylvania, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Fri, Jun 08, 2007 1:17 am | [0] comments

Tuesday, November 14, 2006

U.S. CALORIE INTAKE

U.S. men eating 200 calories more than in 1980, U.S. women 300 calories more

Men and women in the U.S. are eating more calories than they did in 1976-1980. Men are eating an average of 207 calories more per day, while women are eating 317 calories more according to the latest National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) of self-reported food intake among American adults. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Nov 14, 2006 1:51 am | [0] comments

Monday, September 12, 2005

CHILDHOOD OBESITY

Children and adolescents under-report calorie intake; under-reporting increases with age

Children under-report their calorie intake. The amount of under-reporting increases with age to the point of 15- to 17-year-olds under-reporting their calorie intake by a third (34 percent) according to a study from the Elsie Widdowson Laboratory in Cambrige, England. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Sep 12, 2005 3:02 am | [0] comments

Friday, September 09, 2005

LIFETIME FOOD INTAKE

People eat 60 million calories in a lifetime

"During our adult lifetime, each of us in the UK will, on average, eat more than 80,000 meals amounting to some 60 million calories, or to pit it another way, we each eat 600 chickens, 4000 loaves of bread and 5000 kg [11,000 pounds] of potatoes," John R. Krebs from the University of Oxford in Oxford, England stated in a lecture on "food, fact and fantasy". Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Fri, Sep 09, 2005 4:34 am | [0] comments

Tuesday, February 22, 2005

CALORIES

An extra 24 calories per day will cause men to gain of 3.9 lbs per year, women 4.6 lbs

How much weight will a person gain if they consume an extra 24 calories per day for a year? Men will gain 3.9 pounds in a year, while women will gain 4.6 pounds according to a new study from Denmark. Yikes! Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Feb 22, 2005 1:22 am | [0] comments

Thursday, January 27, 2005

CARBOHYDRATE & FAT INTAKE

U.S. women eating more carbs, more fat; men more carbs, less fat

From 1971 to 2000, carbohydrate intake in the U.S. increased by an average of 68 grams per day in men and 62 grams per day in women. Fat intake increased in women by 6.5 grams per day, but decreased by 5.3 grams per day in men. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Thu, Jan 27, 2005 5:28 am | [0] comments

CALORIE INTAKE

U.S. women consuming 335 calories more than in 1971, men 168 calories more

From 1971 to 2000, the average daily calorie intake for U.S. adults increased by 335 calories in women and 168 calories in men. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Thu, Jan 27, 2005 5:01 am | [0] comments
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