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Sunday, June 02, 2019

POTASSIUM

The benefits of consuming more potassium: lower risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer and death

Numerous studies have shown that people who consume more potassium have the following benefits:

  • Lower risk of heart disease
  • Lower risk of stroke
  • Lower risk of cancer
  • Lower risk of death.

The average U.S. adult consumes 2700 mg/day.

The National Academy of Sciences recommends we consume at least 4700 mg per day.

Below is evidence from several studies about the benefits of consuming more potassium.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sun, Jun 02, 2019 5:02 pm | [0] comments

Monday, August 22, 2016

PROTEIN INTAKE & MORTALITY

High-protein diet associated with 1.7-fold greater risk of dying over the next 18 yrs in those 50-65

People 50- to 65-years old who consumed a high-protein diet, defined as consuming 20% or more of calories from protein, were 1.73 times more likely to die over the next 18 years than people who consumed a low-protein diet, defined as consuming less than 10% of calories from protein, according to a study from researchers at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, California, USA.

“None of these associations was significantly affected by controlling for percent calories from total fat or for percent calories from total carbohydrates,” the paper notes.

“However, when the percent calories from animal protein was controlled for, the association between total protein and all-cause or cancer mortality was eliminated or significantly reduced, respectively, suggesting animal proteins are responsible for a significant portion of these relationships.”

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Aug 22, 2016 7:57 am | [0] comments

PROTEIN INTAKE & CANCER

Moderate-protein diet associated w/ 3.1-fold greater risk of cancer death over 18 yrs in those 50-65

People 50- to 65-years old who consumed a moderate-protein diet, defined as consuming 10-19% or more of calories from protein, were 3.1 times more likely to die from cancer over the next 18 years than people who consumed a low-protein diet, defined as consuming less than 10% of calories from protein, according to a study from researchers at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, California, USA.

“None of these associations was significantly affected by controlling for percent calories from total fat or for percent calories from total carbohydrates,” the paper notes.

“However, when the percent calories from animal protein was controlled for, the association between total protein and all-cause or cancer mortality was eliminated or significantly reduced, respectively, suggesting animal proteins are responsible for a significant portion of these relationships.”

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Aug 22, 2016 7:51 am | [0] comments

PROTEIN INTAKE & MORTALITY

High-protein diet associated with 4.3-fold greater risk of cancer death over 18 yrs in those 50-65

People 50- to 65-years old who consumed a high-protein diet, defined as consuming 20% or more of calories from protein, were 4.3 times more likely to die from cancer over the next 18 years than people who consumed a low-protein diet, defined as consuming less than 10% of calories from protein, according to a study from researchers at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, California, USA.

“None of these associations was significantly affected by controlling for percent calories from total fat or for percent calories from total carbohydrates,” the paper notes.

“However, when the percent calories from animal protein was controlled for, the association between total protein and all-cause or cancer mortality was eliminated or significantly reduced, respectively, suggesting animal proteins are responsible for a significant portion of these relationships.”

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Aug 22, 2016 7:47 am | [0] comments

PROTEIN INTAKE & MORTALITY

High-protein diet associated with 28% lower risk of dying over the next 18 yrs in those 66 and older

People 66-years and older who consumed a high-protein diet, defined as consuming 20% or more of calories from protein, were 28% less likely to die over the next 18 years than people who consumed a low-protein diet, defined as consuming less than 10% of calories from protein, according to a study from researchers at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, California, USA.

“[T]his was not affected by percent calories from fat, from carbohydrates, or from animal protein,” the paper notes.

In other words, a high-protein diet INCREASED the risk of dying prematurely in people 50-65 years-old, but REDUCED the risk of dying prematurely in those 66-years-old and older.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Aug 22, 2016 7:25 am | [0] comments

PROTEIN INTAKE & MORTALITY

Moderate-protein diet associated with 21% lower risk of dying over the next 18 yrs in those 66+

People 66-years and older who consumed a moderate-protein diet, defined as consuming 10-19% or more of calories from protein, were 21% less likely to die over the next 18 years than people who consumed a low-protein diet, defined as consuming less than 10% of calories from protein, according to a study from researchers at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, California, USA.

“[T]his was not affected by percent calories from fat, from carbohydrates, or from animal protein,” the paper notes.

In other words, a moderate- to high-protein diet INCREASED the risk of dying prematurely in people 50-65 years-old, but REDUCED the risk of dying prematurely in those 66-years-old and older.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Aug 22, 2016 7:18 am | [0] comments

PROTEIN INTAKE & MORTALITY

High-protein diet associated with 60% lower risk of cancer death over the next 18 yrs in those 66+

People 66-years and older who consumed a high-protein diet, defined as consuming 20% or more of calories from protein, were 60% less likely to die from cancer over the next 18 years than people who consumed a low-protein diet, defined as consuming less than 10% of calories from protein, according to a study from researchers at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, California, USA.

In other words, a moderate- to high-protein diet INCREASED the risk of dying prematurely from cancer in people 50-65 years-old, but REDUCED the risk of dying prematurely from cancer in those 66-years-old and older.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Aug 22, 2016 7:10 am | [0] comments

Thursday, July 10, 2014

SEVERE OBESITY & LOST YEARS OF LIFE

Body mass index (BMI) of 40-44.9 is associated 6.5 years of lost life

People with a body mass index (BMI) of 40-44.9 is associated with 6.5 years of lost life compared to people of normal weight with a BMI of 18.5-24.9 according to an analysis of 20 studies from the United States, Sweden, and Australia.

A BMI Table for adults can be found here.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jul 10, 2014 10:49 am | [0] comments

SEVERE OBESITY & LOST YEARS OF LIFE

Body mass index (BMI) of 45-49.9 is associated 8.9 years of lost life

People with a body mass index (BMI) of 45-49.9 is associated with 8.9 years of lost life compared to people of normal weight with a BMI of 18.5-24.9 according to an analysis of 20 studies from the United States, Sweden, and Australia.

A BMI Table for adults can be found here.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jul 10, 2014 10:40 am | [0] comments

SEVERE OBESITY & LOST YEARS OF LIFE

Body mass index (BMI) of 50-54.9 is associated 9.8 years of lost life

People with a body mass index (BMI) of 50-54.9 is associated with 9.8 years of lost life compared to people of normal weight with a BMI of 18.5-24.9 according to an analysis of 20 studies from the United States, Sweden, and Australia.

A BMI Table for adults can be found here.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jul 10, 2014 10:30 am | [0] comments

SEVERE OBESITY & LOST YEARS OF LIFE

Body mass index (BMI) of 55-59.9 is associated 13.7 years of lost life

People with a body mass index (BMI) of 55-59.9 is associated with 13.7 years of lost life compared to people of normal weight with a BMI of 18.5-24.9 according to an analysis of 20 studies from the United States, Sweden, and Australia.

A BMI Table for adults can be found here.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jul 10, 2014 10:20 am | [0] comments

SEVERE OBESITY

Body mass index (BMI) of 40 or greater affects 6% of US adults

Class III obesity, that is having a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or more, affects 6% of US adults according to an analysis of 20 studies from the United States, Sweden, and Australia.

A BMI Table for adults can be found here.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jul 10, 2014 10:10 am | [0] comments

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

WAIST MEASUREMENT

Men whose waist was 40 inches or more were 17% more likely to die over 12 years

Men with a waist circumference of 40 inches or more were 17% greater to die during the 12.8 year follow-up compared to those with a waist circumference of 31 to 37 inches according to a study from Scotland that looked at 20,117 adults, 18- to 86-years-old from a nationally representative sample of the Scottish population that were linked to hospital admissions and death records. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, Dec 21, 2010 4:04 pm | [0] comments

WAIST-TO-HIP RATIO

Men with waist-to-hip ratio of one or more were 34% more likely to die over 12 years

Men with a waist-to-hip ratio of one (1) or more were 34% more likely to die over the 12.8 year follow-up compared to those with a waist-to-hip ratio of 0.85 to 0.95 according to a study from Scotland that looked at 20,117 adults, 18- to 86-years-old from a nationally representative sample of the Scottish population that were linked to hospital admissions and death records. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, Dec 21, 2010 3:55 pm | [0] comments

WAIST MEASUREMENT

Women whose waist was 35 inches or more were 17% more likely to die over 12 years

Women with a waist circumference of 35 inches or more were 17% greater to die during the 12.8 year follow-up compared to those with a waist circumference of 27 to 31 inches according to a study from Scotland that looked at 20,117 adults, 18- to 86-years-old from a nationally representative sample of the Scottish population that were linked to hospital admissions and death records. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, Dec 21, 2010 3:50 pm | [0] comments

WAIST-TO-HIP RATIO

Women with waist-to-hip ratio of 0.85 or more were 34% more likely to die over 12 years

Women with a waist-to-hip ratio of 0.85 or more were 34% more likely to die over the 12.8 year follow-up compared to those with a waist-to-hip ratio of 0.85 to 0.95 according to a study from Scotland that looked at 20,117 adults, 18- to 86-years-old from a nationally representative sample of the Scottish population that were linked to hospital admissions and death records. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, Dec 21, 2010 3:40 pm | [0] comments

Monday, March 15, 2010

WEIGHT LOSS AND MORTALITY

Obese men who lost 5-15% of body weight reduced risk of dying by 22% over the next 6-12 years

Obese men, 50 and older, who lost 5-15% of body weight reduced their risk of dying by 22% over the next 6-12 years compared to men who lost less than 5% according to a study by researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

This was after adjusting for after adjusting for age, race, ethnicity and various risk factors. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Mar 15, 2010 11:00 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, October 07, 2009

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Lean, physically inactive men 54% greater risk of death than the most active lean men

The one-third of lean men (BMI less than 25), 45- to 79-years-old, who were the lean physically active were 54 percent more likely to die during a 9.7 year followup than the one-third of lean men who were the most physically active according to a recent study of 37,633 men men.

To say this the other way, the most active lean men were 35 percent less likely to die that the least active lean men. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Oct 07, 2009 10:59 am | [0] comments

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Obese, physically inactive men 81% greater risk of death than the most active lean men

Obese (BMI 30 or more) physically inactive men, 45- to 79-years-old, were 81 percent more likely to die during a 9.7 year followup than the one-third of lean men (BMI less than 25) who were the most physically active according to a recent study of 37,633 men men.

To say this the other way, the most active lean men were 45 percent less likely to die that the least active lean men. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Oct 07, 2009 9:21 am | [0] comments

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Obese, physically active men 65% greater risk of death than most active lean men after adjustments

After excluding
  • the first 3 years of follow-up

  • current and former smokers

  • those who had lost weight from age 20 years to age at baseline

  • heavy manual workers
overweight-to-obese physically active men, 45- to 79-years-old, were 65 percent more likely to die during a 9.7 year followup than the one-third of lean men (BMI less than 25) who were the most physically active according to a recent study of 37,633 men men. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Oct 07, 2009 9:07 am | [0] comments

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Lean, physically inactive men 115% greater risk of death than most active lean men after adjustments

After excluding
  • the first 3 years of follow-up

  • current and former smokers

  • those who had lost weight from age 20 years to age at baseline

  • heavy manual workers
lean (BMI less than 25) physically inactive men, 45- to 79-years-old, were 115 percent more likely to die during a 9.7 year followup -- that is, 2.2 times more likely to die -- than the one-third of lean men (BMI less than 25) who were the most physically active according to a recent study of 37,633 men men. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Oct 07, 2009 8:52 am | [0] comments

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Overweight/obese inactive men 104% greater risk of death than lean active men after adjustments

After excluding
  • the first 3 years of follow-up

  • current and former smokers

  • those who had lost weight from age 20 years to age at baseline

  • heavy manual workers
lean (BMI less than 25) physically inactive men, 45- to 79-years-old, were 104 percent more likely to die during a 9.7 year followup -- that is, 2 times more likely to die -- than the one-third of lean men (BMI less than 25) who were the most physically active according to a recent study of 37,633 men men. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Oct 07, 2009 8:46 am | [0] comments

Thursday, January 15, 2009

HOMOCYSTEINE

A 5 point increase in homocysteine increases the risk of all-cause mortality by 49%

A 5 point increase in homocysteine levels increases the risk of all-cause mortality by 49 percent as noted in this speech by Patrick Holford at the 2005 Orthomolecular Conference. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jan 15, 2009 9:44 am | [0] comments

Thursday, September 04, 2008

MORTALITY

Intentional weight loss reduces risk of death by 24%

People who intentionally lost weight reduced their risk of death over a 9-year period of time by 24 percent compared to people who were not trying to lose weight and reported no weight change according to a 2003 study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that followed 6391 overweight and obese persons with a body mass index of 25 or more who were at least 35 years of age. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Sep 04, 2008 3:23 pm | [0] comments

MORTALITY

Unintentional weight loss increases risk of death by 31%

People who unintentionally lost weight had a 31 percent increased risk of death over a 9-year period compared to people who were not trying to lose weight and reported no weight change according to a 2003 study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that followed 6391 overweight and obese persons with a body mass index of 25 or more who were at least 35 years of age. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Sep 04, 2008 3:18 pm | [0] comments

MORTALITY

Trying to weight with no weight change still reduces risk of death by 20%

Trying to lose weight, even if you do not lose any weight, reduces the risk of death according to a 2003 study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that followed 6391 overweight and obese persons with a body mass index of 25 or more who were at least 35 years of age.

People who tried to lose weight but had no weight change were still 20 percent less likely to die over a 9-year period compared to people who were not trying to lose weight and reported no weight change.

I assume that many of these people initially lost weight, but then regained the weight that they had lost. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Sep 04, 2008 3:11 pm | [0] comments

MORTALITY

Trying to weight loss but gaining weight instead still reduces risk of death by 6%

People who were trying to lose weight but gained weight instead were still 6 percent less likely to die over a 9-year period compared to people who were not trying to lose weight and reported no weight change according to a 2003 study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that followed 6391 overweight and obese persons with a body mass index of 25 or more who were at least 35 years of age.

I assume that many of these people initially lost weight, but then regained more weight than they lost. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Sep 04, 2008 3:06 pm | [0] comments

MORTALITY

Excellent graph showing increased risk of death with increasing body weight

Here is an excellent, simple graph showing the increased risk of death as weight increases.

This graph is from a 1988 paper by George Bray, MD and others that was published in the Western Journal of Medicine. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Sep 04, 2008 2:55 pm | [0] comments

Tuesday, August 19, 2008

ELDERLY

Obesity among elderly does not increase the risk of death

Among people who were 65 or older, those who were obese, that is had a BMI of 30-35, were twice as likely to have difficulties with activities of daily living, but were no more likely to die during the five years of the study than those with a recommended BMI of 20-25 according to The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, Aug 19, 2008 5:56 am | [0] comments

Friday, May 30, 2008

BODY WEIGHT & MORTALITY

Lowest risk of death in women associated with body mass index (BMI) of 21 to 23.4

The lowest risk of death in women is associated with a body mass index (BMI) of 21-23.4 according to a new study from the National Cancer Institute located in Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, May 30, 2008 6:11 am | [0] comments

Friday, February 29, 2008

WHOLE GRAIN

Whole-grains, but not refined grains, lower the risk of death

Men who consumed one or more servings of whole-grain cereal per day -- but not refined grains -- were 20 percent less likely to die from cardiovascular causes during a five-and-one-half year follow-up, and 17 percent less likely to die from all causes according to a study from according to a study from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. "[ Our data ] highlight the importance of distinguishing whole-grain from refined-grain cereals in the prevention of chronic diseases," the paper concluded. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Feb 29, 2008 8:40 am | [0] comments

Friday, January 11, 2008

RISK OF EXCESS WEIGHT

Being overweight at 40 decreases life expectancy of men by 3.1 years, women 3.3 years

According to the Framingham Heart Study, being overweight, that is having a body mass index (BMI) of 25 to 29.9, decreases life expectancy by 3.1 years in men, and 3.3 years in women notes the report Storing Up Problems: The Medical Case for a Slimmer Nation by the Royal College of Physicians. They note that this could help to explain why poor people are more likely to be obese in developed countries. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Jan 11, 2008 9:44 am | [0] comments

RISK OF EXCESS WEIGHT

Being obese at 40 decreases life expectancy of men by 6.7 years, women 7.1 years

According to the Framingham Heart Study, being obese, that is having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more, but a non-smoker, decreases life expectancy by 6.7 years in men, and 7.1 years in women notes the report Storing Up Problems: The Medical Case for a Slimmer Nation by the Royal College of Physicians. They note that this could help to explain why poor people are more likely to be obese in developed countries. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Jan 11, 2008 9:39 am | [0] comments

RISK OF EXCESS WEIGHT

Smoking and being obese at 40 decreases life expectancy of men by 13.7 years, women 13.3 years

According to the Framingham Heart Study, being a smoker and being obese, that is having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more, decreases life expectancy by 13.7 years in men, and 13.3 years in women notes the report Storing Up Problems: The Medical Case for a Slimmer Nation by the Royal College of Physicians. They note that this could help to explain why poor people are more likely to be obese in developed countries. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Jan 11, 2008 9:35 am | [0] comments

RISK OF EXCESS WEIGHT

Every 1 lbs increase in weight increases the risk of death by 1% for those 30- to 42-years-old

According to the Framingham Study, every pound of extra weight increases the risk of death by one percent for people 30- to 42-years-old notes the report Storing Up Problems: The Medical Case for a Slimmer Nation by the Royal College of Physicians. They note that this could help to explain why poor people are more likely to be obese in developed countries. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Jan 11, 2008 9:30 am | [0] comments

RISK OF EXCESS WEIGHT

Every 1 lbs increase in weight increases the risk of death by 2% for those 50- to 62-years-old

According to the Framingham Study, every pound of extra weight increases the risk of death by two percent for people 50- to 62-years-old notes the report Storing Up Problems: The Medical Case for a Slimmer Nation by the Royal College of Physicians. They note that this could help to explain why poor people are more likely to be obese in developed countries. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Jan 11, 2008 9:24 am | [0] comments

RISK OF EXCESS WEIGHT

BMI at the age of 30-49 predicts mortality after the age of 50-69

"[Body mass index] BMI at ages 30 to 49 years predicted mortality after ages 50 to 69 years, even after adjustment for BMI at age 50 to 69 years" notes the report Storing Up Problems: The Medical Case for a Slimmer Nation by the Royal College of Physicians. They note that this could help to explain why poor people are more likely to be obese in developed countries. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Jan 11, 2008 9:23 am | [0] comments

RISK OF EXCESS WEIGHT

The increased risk of death associated with being overweight is highest for those 30-44 years-old

"[Body mass index] BMI at ages 30 to 49 years predicted mortality after ages 50 to 69 years, even after adjustment for BMI at age 50 to 69 years" notes the report Storing Up Problems: The Medical Case for a Slimmer Nation by the Royal College of Physicians. They note that this could help to explain why poor people are more likely to be obese in developed countries. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Jan 11, 2008 9:20 am | [0] comments

RISK OF EXCESS WEIGHT

Whole body obesity changes circulation and heart function

Whole body obesity changes circulation and heart function notes the report Storing Up Problems: The Medical Case for a Slimmer Nation by the Royal College of Physicians. They note that this could help to explain why poor people are more likely to be obese in developed countries. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Jan 11, 2008 9:15 am | [0] comments

RISK OF EXCESS WEIGHT

Abdominal obesity changes breathing

Central obesity, also called abdominal obesity, which is excess fat around the chest and abdomen, restricts chest movements and alters breathing notes the report Storing Up Problems: The Medical Case for a Slimmer Nation by the Royal College of Physicians. They note that this could help to explain why poor people are more likely to be obese in developed countries. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Jan 11, 2008 9:13 am | [0] comments

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