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Monday, August 12, 2019

STATINS

Taking a statin for more than 2 years increases the risk of diabetes 3.3-fold

Taking a statin for more than 2 years increases the risk of diabetes 3.3-fold according to a 2019 study.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Aug 12, 2019 10:39 am | [0] comments

Monday, July 29, 2019

STATINS

How much longer will you live if you take a statin for 5 years? 13 days.

How much longer will you live if you take a statin for 5 years?

13 days according to a 2019 analysis by researchers from Denmark.

That’s it, 13 days.

To put this in perspective, the authors of the paper noted that “A different study evaluated the effects of regular exercise and a calorie restricted diet in healthy males, [demonstrated] a postponement of death by 6.2 months [189 days],” and “smoking cessation in a high-risk population postponed death by around 31 months [930 days].”

So if you stop smoking, you will live, on average, an extra 930 days. If you exercise and reduce your calories, you will live, on average, an extra 189 days. And if you take a statin, you will live, on average, an extra 13 days.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Jul 29, 2019 8:08 am | [0] comments

Friday, April 05, 2019

STATINS

High-intensity statin therapy increases risk of acute kidney injury by 16%

High-intensity statin therapy was found to increase the risk of hospitalization for acute kidney injury by 16% compared to non-users during a median follow-up of 4.6 years according to a new study.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Apr 05, 2019 11:15 am | [0] comments

STATINS

High-intensity statin therapy increases risk of acute kidney injury in those older than 75 by 22%

High-intensity statin therapy was found to increase the risk of hospitalization for acute kidney injury in those over 75-years by 22% compared to non-users during a median follow-up of 4.6 years according to a new study.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Apr 05, 2019 11:10 am | [0] comments

STATINS

High-intensity statin therapy increases risk of acute kidney injury in those 65-75 by 9%

High-intensity statin therapy was found to increase the risk of hospitalization for acute kidney injury in those 65-75 years by 9% compared to non-users during a median follow-up of 4.6 years according to a new study.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Apr 05, 2019 11:05 am | [0] comments

STATINS

High-intensity statin therapy increases risk of acute kidney injury in women by 29%

High-intensity statin therapy was found to increase the risk of hospitalization for acute kidney injury in women by 29% compared to non-users during a median follow-up of 4.6 years according to a new study.

The study showed that the risk of hospitalization for acute kidney injury with high-intensity statin use was greater among women than men.

The authors of the study speculated that the reason for this “may be due to higher blood levels of statin at a given dose among women than in men, due to the generally lower body size of women.”

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Apr 05, 2019 10:55 am | [0] comments

Sunday, October 14, 2018

STATINS & CANCER

Statins do NOT increase cancer survival, may increase risk of death 7%

Statins do not increase cancer survival as some studies have claimed.

When researchers eliminated biases from study designs, they found that there was no difference in cancer survival between statin users and non-users.

There was no difference in cancer survival between users and non-users (0% difference), but there was a 7% increased risk of dying overall in statin users versus non-users during the 3-year follow-up period, but this difference was not statistically significant.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sun, Oct 14, 2018 8:47 am | [0] comments

Friday, August 17, 2018

BOOK

Book: The Case Against Statins

I just published a book called The Case Against Statins.

It is a collection of articles that I have written about statins over the past 11 years.

It contains evidence that:

  • Statins are not effective.
  • Statins increase atherosclerosis.
  • Statins increase the risk of heart attacks.
  • Statins increase the risk of certain cancers.
  • Statins increase the risk of diabetes.
  • Statins increase the risk of Parkinson’s.
  • Statins increase the risk of Alzheimer’s.
  • Statins increase the risk of ALS.
  • Statins increase the risk of cataracts.
  • Statins increase the risk of kidney failure.
  • Statins increase the risk of liver dysfunction.
  • Statins increase erectile dysfunction.
  • Statins increase muscle fatigue.
  • Statins can cause muscle rupture.
  • Statins have an immunosuppressive effect.
  • Statins increase the risk of dying.

This book is just about statins, but the problem is not just with statins.

It is a problem with most drugs given long-term.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Aug 17, 2018 11:23 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, August 01, 2018

STATINS & CANCER

Prolonged use of statins associated with a 18% increased risk of lung cancer

Prolonged use of statins for more than 4 years was associated with an 18% increased risk of lung cancer according to a recent analysis of data from 574 UK general practices from 1998-2008.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Aug 01, 2018 8:59 am | [0] comments

STATINS & CANCER

Prolonged use of statins associated with a 23% increased risk of colorectal cancer

Prolonged use of statins for more than 4 years was associated with a 23% increased risk of colorectal cancer according to a recent analysis of data from 574 UK general practices from 1998-2008.

Prolonged use of atorvastatin (Lipitor) for more than 4 years was associated with a 51% increased risk of colorectal cancer.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Aug 01, 2018 8:47 am | [0] comments

STATINS & CANCER

Prolonged use of statins associated with a 29% increased risk of bladder cancer

Prolonged use of statins for more than 4 years was associated with a 29% increased risk of bladder cancer according to a recent analysis of data from 574 UK general practices from 1998-2008.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Aug 01, 2018 8:38 am | [0] comments

Sunday, June 10, 2018

STATINS

Statins increase risk of Type 2 diabetes 46% due to decreased insulin secretion and sensitivity

“Statin treatment increased the risk of type 2 diabetes by 46%, attributable to decreases in insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion,” concludes a 2015 study that followed 8,749 non-diabetic participants, 45– to 73-years-old, for 5.9 years.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sun, Jun 10, 2018 11:34 am | [0] comments

Monday, May 28, 2018

STATINS & CANCER

People given a statin had 25% more new cancers

People given the statin, pravastatin (Pravachol), had 25% more cancer than those given a placebo in the PROSPER trial.

  • 65% more breast cancer
  • 46% more gastrointestinal cancer
  • 12% more respiratory cancer
  • 41% more other cancers
  • and they did not including non-melanoma skin cancer.
    (Previous studies have found that statins increase the risk of non-melanoma skin cancers.)

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, May 28, 2018 11:54 am | [0] comments

Sunday, May 27, 2018

STATINS & CANCER

Women given a statin (pravastatin) had 12-times as much breast cancer

Women given the statin, pravastatin (Pravachol), had 12-times as much breast cancer as women given a placebo in the CARE trial.

Drug companies and their paid researchers have tried to convince people that statins lower the risk of cancer, but this study and many others suggest that the exact opposite is true — that statins increase the risk of cancer, not decrease the risk.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sun, May 27, 2018 8:22 am | [0] comments

Saturday, May 26, 2018

STATINS & CANCER

Long-term statin use increases breast cancer 2-fold

Long-term statin use (10 years or more) is associated with a more than 2-fold increased risk of breast cancer according to researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington.

Drug companies 
and their paid researchers have tried to convince people that 
statins lower the risk of cancer,
 but this study 
and many others 
suggest that the 
exact opposite is true — 
that statins increase the risk of cancer, not decrease the risk.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sat, May 26, 2018 10:03 am | [0] comments

Thursday, May 17, 2018

STATINS

2.8 times more people given lovastatin died than those given a placebo (0.50% vs 0.18%)

In the first statin study called the Expanded Clinical Evaluation of Lovastatin (EXCEL) study (1991), all-cause mortality was 2.8 times greater in people given lovastatin than those given a placebo (0.50% vs 0.18%) during the first year of follow-up as noted in a 1992 paper published in the British Medical Journal titled Should there be a moratorium on the use of cholesterol lowering drugs?

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, May 17, 2018 11:33 am | [0] comments

STATINS

While statin use increased 68% (1999-2005), heart attacks increased 16%, strokes 45%!

Statin use among US adults increased by 68% from 1999 to 2005, from 8% of people surveyed to 13.4% of people surveyed.

How much do you think this reduced heart attacks, strokes and coronary heart disease?

Would you be surprised to learn that during this time that:

  • Heart attacks increased by 16%!
    (from 3.4% to 3.7%)
  • Strokes increased by 45%!
    (from 2.0% to 2.9%)
  • Coronary heart disease increased by 32%!
    (from 2.8% to 3.7%)
  • Type 2 diabetes increased by 32%!
    (from 7.8% to 10.3%)
  • People with one or more of these conditions increased by 19%!
    (from 13.4% to 16%)

Do you believe that statins reduce the risk of heart attack, stroke and death?

I do not.

The results of the study mentioned above suggests the exact opposite.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, May 17, 2018 8:54 am | [0] comments

Tuesday, May 08, 2018

PARKINSON’S

Low cholesterol levels associated with 2.3 times greater risk of Parkinson’s disease

The one-third of people with the highest cholesterol levels were 57% less likely to get Parkinson’s during a 20-year follow-up compared to the one-third of people with the lowest cholesterol levels according to a recent study.

The one-third of people with the middle cholesterol levels were 44% less likely to get Parkinson’s compared to the one-third of people with the lowest cholesterol levels.

The say this the other way, the one-third of people with the lowest cholesterol levels were 2.3 times more likely to get Parkinson’s than the one-third of people with the highest cholesterol levels, and they were 1.8 times more likely to get Parkinson’s compared to the one-third of people with the middle cholesterol levels.

“Our study suggests that lowering cholesterol unnecessarily actually may harm the brain,”  Xuemei Huang, MD, PhD lead author of the study was quoted as saying.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, May 08, 2018 6:59 am | [0] comments

STATINS

Statins increase risk of Parkinson’s Disease by 58%

The most popular statins increase the risk of Parkinson’s Disease by 58% according to new study.

These are the lipophilic statins, meaning that they dissolve in fats, which include atorvastatin (Lipitor), fluvastatin (Lescol), lovastatin (Mevacor), pitavastatin (Livalo), simvastatin (Zocor).

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, May 08, 2018 6:31 am | [0] comments

STATINS

Taking both a statin and a nonstatin to lower cholesterol increases risk of Parkinson’s by 95%

People taking both a statin and a nonstatin to lower cholesterol levels had a 95% increased risk of Parkinson’s compared to people taking neither according to a new study.

Nonstatin cholesterol-lowering drugs included fenofibrate (Trilipix, Tricor, Triglide, Antara, Lipofen, Fibricor, Lofibra, and Fenoglide), ezetimibe (Zetia), and niacin.

This study found that the most popular statins increase the risk of Parkinson’s Disease by 58%.

These are the lipophilic statins, meaning that they dissolve in fats, which include atorvastatin (Lipitor), fluvastatin (Lescol), lovastatin (Mevacor), pitavastatin (Livalo), simvastatin (Zocor).

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, May 08, 2018 6:11 am | [0] comments

Friday, May 04, 2018

STATINS & ALZHEIMER’S

Statin use is associated with a 1% to 12% increased risk of Alzheimer’s

Statin use is associated with a 1% to 12% increased risk of Alzheimer’s according to an analysis of data on 30,343,035 persons aged 40 to 65 years between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2012 as noted in an article on Medscape (Melville, 2016).

Reference

Melville NA. Statin Use Linked to Increased Parkinson’s Risk. American Neurological Association (ANA) 2016 Annual Meeting, Presented October 16, 2016; Abstract S137: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/870996.

The article on Medscape notes:

“We identified 20,000 Parkinson’s disease patients and looked at whether using statins was associated with a higher or lower risk, and we found people using statins have a higher risk of the disease, so this is the opposite of what has been hypothesized,” senior author Xuemei Huang, MD, PhD, vice chair for research at Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, told Medscape Medical News.

The same is true for Alzheimer’s — it’s the opposite of what has been hypothesized.

(The same research group found that statin use was found to be associated with a 58% increased risk of Parkinson’s.)

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, May 04, 2018 12:02 pm | [0] comments

Monday, April 09, 2018

STATINS & ALS

Rosuvastatin (Crestor) increases risk of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) 9-fold

Rosuvastatin (Crestor), a statin to lower cholesterol levels, is associated with a 9-fold increase in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) as noted in an article by Dr. Malcolm Kendrick, author of The Great Cholesterol Con and the book Doctoring Data.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 09, 2018 9:53 am | [0] comments

STATINS & ALS

Pravastatin (Pravachol) increases risk of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) 16-fold

Pravastatin (Pravachol), a statin to lower cholesterol levels, is associated with a 16-fold increase in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) as noted in an article by Dr. Malcolm Kendrick, author of The Great Cholesterol Con and the book Doctoring Data.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 09, 2018 9:49 am | [0] comments

STATINS & ALS

Atorvastatin (Lipitor) increases risk of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) 17-fold

Atorvastatin (Lipitor), a statin to lower cholesterol levels, is associated with a 17-fold increase in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) as noted in an article by Dr. Malcolm Kendrick, author of The Great Cholesterol Con and the book Doctoring Data.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 09, 2018 9:43 am | [0] comments

STATINS & ALS

Simvastatin (Zocor and FloL) increases risk of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) 23-fold

Simvastatin (Zocor and FloL), a statin to lower cholesterol levels, is associated with a 23-fold increase in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) as noted in an article by Dr. Malcolm Kendrick, author of The Great Cholesterol Con and the book Doctoring Data.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 09, 2018 9:38 am | [0] comments

STATINS & ALS

Lovastatin (Altoprev) increases risk of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) 107-fold

Lovastatin (Altoprev), a statin to lower cholesterol levels, is associated with a 107-fold increase in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) as noted in an article by Dr. Malcolm Kendrick, author of The Great Cholesterol Con and the book Doctoring Data.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Apr 09, 2018 9:32 am | [0] comments

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

STATINS & CANCER

Do statins increase cancer? Yes, according to three doctors

Do statins increase cancer?

Yes, according to a letter published in Current Oncology.

The letter starts out by saying “prospective data suggest that statins actually increase cancer in certain segments of the population.”

Here are other quotes from the letter.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, Mar 27, 2018 10:38 am | [0] comments

Monday, July 17, 2017

STATINS

Type 1 diabetics taking statins 1-6 years 3-times more likely to have cognitive impairment

Type 1 diabetics taking statins for 1-6 years were 3.2 times more likely to have cognitive impairment compared to Type 1 diabetics who had never taking statins.

Statin use was associated with cognitive impairment, particularly affecting memory, in these middle-aged adults with childhood-onset [type 1 diabetes], whom at this age, should not yet manifest age-related memory deficits,” the authors of the paper concluded.

They also note:

Animal and cell culture studies show that statins can damage cerebral gray and white matter, thereby affecting cognitive function. Findings from human studies remain controversial; early observational studies reported that statin use negatively affected cognition, especially memory, while more recent studies have not replicated these findings.”

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Jul 17, 2017 7:08 pm | [0] comments

STATINS

Type 1 diabetics taking statins 7-12 years 5-times more likely to have cognitive impairment

Type 1 diabetics taking statins for 7-12 years were 4.8 times more likely to have cognitive impairment compared to Type 1 diabetics who had never taking statins.

Statin use was associated with cognitive impairment, particularly affecting memory, in these middle-aged adults with childhood-onset [type 1 diabetes], whom at this age, should not yet manifest age-related memory deficits,” the authors of the paper concluded.

They also note:

Animal and cell culture studies show that statins can damage cerebral gray and white matter, thereby affecting cognitive function. Findings from human studies remain controversial; early observational studies reported that statin use negatively affected cognition, especially memory, while more recent studies have not replicated these findings.”

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Jul 17, 2017 7:00 pm | [0] comments

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

STATINS

Pravastatin increases new cancers by 25% in the elderly

There were 25% more new cancers in elderly people 70-82 who were given 40 mg of pravastatin (Pravachol) per day to lower cholesterol compared to those given a placebo according to the PROSPER trial.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, Jun 27, 2017 6:06 pm | [0] comments

Friday, May 26, 2017

STATINS

People 75 and older taking pravastatin (Pravachol) were 34% more likely to die over 8 years

People 75-years and older without cardiovascular disease who took the statin, pravastatin (Pravachol, 40 mg/day), to lower cholesterol were 34% more likely to have died during the 8 year study than people of the same age not taking a statin although the difference did not quite reach statistical significance.

(There was a 7% chance that the difference between the two groups was due to random chance, but this is close enough for me.)

There were 92 deaths in the pravastatin group versus 65 deaths in the non-statin group.

At the very least this means that pravastatin (Pravachol) provides no benefit to people of this age, and at worst, it means that pravastatin (Pravachol) increases the risk of death considerably.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, May 26, 2017 12:59 pm | [0] comments

STATINS

People 65-74 taking pravastatin (Pravachol) were 8% more likely to die over 8 years

People 65- to 74-years-old without heart disease who took the statin, pravastatin (Pravachol, 40 mg/day), to lower cholesterol were 8% more likely to have died during the 8 year study than people of the same age not taking a statin although the difference was not statistically significant.

There were 141 deaths in the pravastatin group versus 130 deaths in the non-statin group.

At the very least this means that pravastatin (Pravachol) provides no benefit to people of this age, and at worst, it means that pravastatin (Pravachol) increases the risk of death.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, May 26, 2017 12:25 pm | [0] comments

Monday, March 27, 2017

STATINS

Increasing statin usage not associated with decreasing coronary heart disease mortality

“Among the [twelve (12)] Western European countries studied, the large increase in statin utilisation between 2000 and 2012 was not associated with [coronary heart disease] mortality, nor with its rate of change over the years,” notes a recent study.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Mar 27, 2017 12:54 pm | [0] comments

Sunday, March 26, 2017

STATINS

Statin use is associated with a 10-13% increased risk of cataracts

Statin use is associated with a 10-13% increased risk of cataracts according to a new paper.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sun, Mar 26, 2017 12:56 pm | [0] comments

Thursday, January 05, 2017

STATINS & PARKINSONS

Statin use is associated with a 61% greater risk of Parkinson’s disease

Statin use is associated with a 61% greater risk of Parkinson’s disease according to an analysis of data on 30,343,035 people aged 40 to 65 years between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012.

This was after adjusting for age, sex, and other comorbidities, such as hyperlipidemia, diabetes, hypertension, and coronary artery disease.

“We identified 20,000 Parkinson’s disease patients and looked at whether using statins was associated with a higher or lower risk, and we found people using statins have a higher risk of the disease, so this is the opposite of what has been hypothesized,” senior author Xuemei Huang, MD, PhD, vice chair for research at Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, told Medscape Medical News.

“Our study suggests that lowering cholesterol unnecessarily actually may harm the brain,”  Xuemei Huang, MD, PhD lead author of the study was quoted as saying.

Previous research has failed to recognize this or reported the opposite, that statins lower the risk of Parkinson’s, because previous studies have failed to adjust for cholesterol levels.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jan 05, 2017 2:00 pm | [0] comments

STATINS & PARKINSONS

Statin use is associated with a 1-12% greater risk of Alzheimer’s disease

Statin use is associated with a 1-12% greater risk of Alzheimer’s disease according to an analysis of data on 30,343,035 people aged 40 to 65 years between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2012.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jan 05, 2017 1:40 pm | [0] comments

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

STATINS

While statin use increased 68% (1999-2005), heart attacks increased 16%, strokes 45%!

Statin use among US adults increased dramatically from 1999 to 2005 from 8% of people surveyed to 13.4% of people surveyed, a relative increase of 68%.

How much do you think this reduced heart attacks, strokes and coronary heart disease?

Would you be surprised to learn that during this time that:

Heart attacks increased from 3.4% to 3.7%, a relative increase of 16%!

Strokes increased from 2.0% to 2.9%, a relative increase of 45%!

Coronary heart disease increased from 2.8% to 3.7%, a relative increase of 32%!

Type 2 diabetes increased from 7.8% to 10.3%, a relative increase of 32%!

People with one or more of these conditions increased from 13.4% to 16%, a relative increase of 19%!

Do you believe that statins reduce the risk of heart attack, stroke and death?

I do not.

The results of the study mentioned above suggests the exact opposite.

Below is more evidence that statins are not the wonderful, life-saving drugs that we have been led to believe, but instead the exact opposite: that statins are causing harm.
Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Sep 21, 2016 12:12 pm | [0] comments

Friday, September 16, 2016

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

‘Conflict of interest ... is a cancer eating at the core of medical research,’ says Dr Kailash Chand

Medical research is fraught with incompetence, careerism and fraud. Conflict of interest ... is a cancer eating at the core of medical research,” Dr. Kailash Chand, deputy chairman of the British Medical Association, “who is an outspoken critic of what he regards as industry-driven hype surrounding statins” was quoted as saying in a Dec 2015 article published on the Daily Mail Online.

The more embedded the financial and other interests in the outcome of a study, the more likely the findings are going to be false.

“We need doctors to concentrate on research that matters to patients, not their careers or the advance of drug companies.”

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Sep 16, 2016 12:39 pm | [0] comments

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

Statin benefits have been ‘grossly exaggerated’ says Dr. Kailash Chand of the British Medical Assoc.

Dr. Kailash Chand, deputy chairman of the British Medical Association, believes that statin benefits have been “grossly exaggerated” and that there is a lack of transparency over the statins’ side effects,’ as he was quoted as saying in a Dec 2015 article published on the Daily Mail Online as saying.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Sep 16, 2016 12:35 pm | [0] comments

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

Study claiming negative news stories about statins caused deaths is very misleading says Dr. Chand

Regarding a paper claiming that news stories about statin side effects caused people to die from heart attacks because they had stopped their statins [which I think is complete nonsense], Dr. Kailash Chand, deputy chairman of the British Medical Association, who is an outspoken critic of what he regards as industry-driven hype surrounding statins, “argued that in his view the conclusions of the study were ‘very misleading’ and detracted from the real issues surrounding statins - lack of transparency over the drugs’ side effects and the fact that their benefits have been ‘grossly exaggerated’” according to an article from Dec 2015 article published on the Daily Mail Online.

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Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Sep 16, 2016 12:30 pm | [0] comments

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