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Saturday, December 06, 2014

OBESITY & LIFESPAN

Being obese (BMI 30-35) shortens lifespan in men 20- to 39-years-old by 5.9 years

Being obese (BMI of 30-35) is estimated to shorten lifespan in men 20-39 years-old by 5.9 years when compared to those with an ideal BMI of 18-25 according to a new study from researchers at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.

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Posted by Admin2 on Sat, Dec 06, 2014 2:14 pm | [0] comments

OBESITY & LIFESPAN

Being very obese (BMI 35+) shortens lifespan in men 20- to 39-years-old by 8.4 years

Being very obese (BMI of 35+) is estimated to shorten lifespan in men 20-39 years-old by an average of 8.4 years when compared to those with an ideal BMI of 18-25 according to a new study from researchers at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.

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Posted by Admin2 on Sat, Dec 06, 2014 2:10 pm | [0] comments

OBESITY & LIFESPAN

Being very obese (BMI 35+) shortens lifespan in women 20- to 39-years-old by 6.1 years

Being very obese (BMI of 35+) is estimated to shorten lifespan in women 20-39 years-old by an average of 6.1 years when compared to those with an ideal BMI of 18-25 according to a new study from researchers at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.

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Posted by Admin2 on Sat, Dec 06, 2014 2:06 pm | [0] comments

OBESITY & LIFESPAN

Being obese (BMI 30-35) shortens lifespan in men 60- to 79-years-old by 0.8 years

Being obese, (BMI 30-35), shortens lifespan in men 60-79 years-old by an average of only 0.8 years according to a new study from researchers at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.

In other words, being obese is less threatening to health as people get older.

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Posted by Admin2 on Sat, Dec 06, 2014 1:45 pm | [0] comments

OBESITY & LIFESPAN

Being very obese (BMI 35+) shortens lifespan in men 60- to 79-years-old by 0.9 years

Being very obese (BMI of 35+) is estimated to shorten lifespan in men 60-79 years-old by an average of only 0.9 years when compared to those with an ideal BMI of 18-25 according to a new study from researchers at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.

In other words, being obese is less threatening to health as people get older.

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Posted by Admin2 on Sat, Dec 06, 2014 1:40 pm | [0] comments

OBESITY & LIFESPAN

Being very obese (BMI 35+) shortens lifespan in women 60- to 79-years-old by 0.9 years

Being very obese (BMI of 35+) is estimated to shorten lifespan in women 60-79 years-old by an average of only 0.9 years when compared to those with an ideal BMI of 18-25 according to a new study from researchers at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.

In other words, being obese is less threatening to health as people get older.

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Posted by Admin2 on Sat, Dec 06, 2014 1:30 pm | [0] comments

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

OBESITY & MORTALITY

Obesity accounts for 18% of deaths among Black and White Americans between the ages of 40 and 85

Obesity accounted for 18 percent of deaths among Black and White Americans between the ages of 40 and 85 according to Ryan Masters, PhD, and others who conducted research as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health.

This finding challenges the prevailing wisdom among scientists, which is that only about 5% of deaths are due to obesity.

This finding shows that obesity is responsible for about 3.6 times more deaths than previously thought.

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Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Aug 20, 2013 4:10 pm | [0] comments

OBESITY & MORTALITY

Obesity and overweight accounts for 27% of deaths among Black women in the U.S.

Obesity and overweight accounts for 27% of deaths among Black women in the U.S. according to Ryan Masters, PhD who conducted research as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health.

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Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Aug 20, 2013 4:05 pm | [0] comments

OBESITY & MORTALITY

Obesity and overweight accounts for 21% of deaths among White women in the U.S.

Obesity and overweight accounts for 21% of deaths among White women in the U.S. according to Ryan Masters, PhD who conducted research as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health.

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Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Aug 20, 2013 4:00 pm | [0] comments

OBESITY & MORTALITY

Obesity and overweight accounts for 15% of deaths among White men in the U.S.

Obesity and overweight accounts for 15% of deaths among White men in the U.S. according to Ryan Masters, PhD who conducted research as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health.

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Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Aug 20, 2013 3:57 pm | [0] comments

OBESITY & MORTALITY

Obesity and overweight accounts for 5% of deaths among Black men in the U.S.

Obesity and overweight accounts for 5% of deaths among Black men in the U.S. according to Ryan Masters, PhD who conducted research as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health.

While White men and Black men have similar rates of obesity, the effect of obesity on mortality is lower in Black men because it is “crowded out” by other risk factors, from high rates of cigarette smoking to challenging socioeconomic conditions according to the researchers.

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Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Aug 20, 2013 3:55 pm | [0] comments

OBESITY & LIFE EXPECTANCY

Obesity reduces life expectancy in U.S. women at age 50 years by 1.5 years

Obesity reduces life expectancy in U.S. women at age 50 years by 1.54 years as of 2006 according to a study by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

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Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Aug 20, 2013 2:57 pm | [0] comments

OBESITY & LIFE EXPECTANCY

Obesity reduces life expectancy in U.S. men at age 50 years by 1.9 years

Obesity reduces life expectancy in U.S. men at age 50 years by 1.85 years as of 2006 according to a study by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

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Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Aug 20, 2013 2:45 pm | [0] comments

Wednesday, April 21, 2010

FAT LOSS AND DEATH

Fat loss decreases the risk of dying 3-17%

Fat loss decreases the risk of dying 3 to 17 percent, whereas weight loss increases the risk of dying 2 to 6 percent according to a 1998 study from researchers at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital at Columbia University in New York. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Apr 21, 2010 7:16 am | [0] comments

Thursday, March 26, 2009

MORTALITY

Obesity and mortality: Avoiding a weight gain of 20-30 lbs increases life expectancy by 2 years

An overweight adult who avoids gaining 20-30 lbs increases their life expectancy by about 2 years according to a study by Epidemiologist Dr. Gary Whitlock of Oxford University published on-line in The Lancet on March 18, 2009.
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Posted by Admin2 on Thu, Mar 26, 2009 2:44 pm | [0] comments

MORTALITY

Obesity and mortality: Avoiding a weight gain of 40-60 lbs increases life expectancy by 3 years

An normal weight adult who avoids gaining 40-60 lbs increases their life expectancy by about 3 years according to a study by Epidemiologist Dr. Gary Whitlock of Oxford University published on-line in The Lancet on March 18, 2009.
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Posted by Admin2 on Thu, Mar 26, 2009 1:56 pm | [0] comments

Wednesday, March 25, 2009

MORTALITY

Obesity and mortality: Being morbidly obese with a BMI of 40-50 reduces lifespan by 8-10 years

Being morbidly obese with a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 40-50 is estimated to reduce lifespan by 8-10 years during the 10-15 years of follow-up when compared to those with a BMI of 22.5 to 25 according to a study by Epidemiologist Dr. Gary Whitlock of Oxford University published on-line in The Lancet on March 18, 2009. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Mar 25, 2009 4:13 pm | [0] comments

MORTALITY

Obesity and mortality: Being moderately obese decreases lifespan by 2-4 years

Being moderately obese with a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30 to 35 is estimated to reduce lifespan by 2 to 4 years during the 10-15 years of follow-up when compared to those with a BMI of 22.5 to 25 according to a study by Epidemiologist Dr. Gary Whitlock of Oxford University published on-line in The Lancet on March 18, 2009. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Mar 25, 2009 2:33 pm | [0] comments

MORTALITY

Obesity and mortality: Being 25-35 lbs overweight decreases lifespan by 1-2 years

Being 25-35 pounds overweight, that is, having a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 27.5 to 30, is estimated to reduce lifespan by 1-2 years when compared to those with a BMI of 22.5 to 25, which had the lowest risk of death during the 10-15 years of follow-up according to a study by Epidemiologist Dr. Gary Whitlock of Oxford University published on-line in The Lancet on March 18, 2009. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Mar 25, 2009 12:47 pm | [0] comments

MORTALITY

Obesity and mortality: Being 15-20 lbs overweight decreases lifespan by one year or less

Being 15-20 pounds overweight by the age of 60, that is, having a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 25 to 27.5, is estimated to reduce lifespan by one year or less when compared to those with a BMI of 22.5 to 25, which had the lowest risk of death during the 10-15 years of follow-up according to a study by Epidemiologist Dr. Gary Whitlock of Oxford University published on-line in The Lancet on March 18, 2009. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Mar 25, 2009 11:58 am | [0] comments

MORTALITY

Obesity and mortality: Risk of death increases 30% for every 30-35 lbs of excess weight

For roughly every 30-35 pounds of excess body weight a person carries over and above having a BMI of 25, their risk of death over the next 10-15 years increases by roughly 30%. This according to a study by Epidemiologist Dr. Gary Whitlock of Oxford University published on-line in The Lancet on March 18, 2009. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Mar 25, 2009 11:24 am | [0] comments

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

MORTALITY

Obesity and mortality: Lowest risk of death with BMI of 22.5 to 25

People with a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 22.5 to 25 have the lowest risk of dying according to a study by Epidemiologist Dr. Gary Whitlock of Oxford University published on-line in The Lancet on March 18, 2009. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Mar 24, 2009 11:32 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, December 03, 2008

WEIGHT AND MORTALITY

Underweight smoking women with BMI less than 18.5, 9.4 times more likely to die within 10 years

Women who smoked and were underweight with a body mass index (BMI) of less than 18.5, were 9.4 times more likely to die during a 10-year follow-up than normal weight women who had never smoked according to a new study from the US’s National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

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Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Dec 03, 2008 7:41 am | [0] comments

WEIGHT AND MORTALITY

Normal weight smoking women with BMI 23.5-25, 5.4 times more likely to die during 10 year follow-up

Women who smoked and were normal weight with a body mass index (BMI) of less than 23.5-25 were 5.4 times more likely to die during a 10-year follow-up than normal weight women who had never smoked according to a new study from the US’s National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

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Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Dec 03, 2008 7:36 am | [0] comments

WEIGHT AND MORTALITY

Overweight smoking women with BMI 25-30, 5.1 times more likely to die during 10 year follow-up

Women who smoked and were overweight with a body mass index (BMI) of 25 to 30 were 5.1 times more likely to die during a 10-year follow-up than normal weight women who had never smoked according to a new study from the US’s National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

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Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Dec 03, 2008 7:32 am | [0] comments

WEIGHT AND MORTALITY

Obese smoking women with BMI 30-35, 5.9 times more likely to die during 10 year follow-up

Women who smoked and were obese with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 to 35 were 5.9 times more likely to die during a 10-year follow-up than normal weight women who had never smoked according to a new study from the US’s National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

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Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Dec 03, 2008 7:28 am | [0] comments

WEIGHT AND MORTALITY

Obese smoking women with BMI 35 or more, 6.6 times more likely to die during 10-year follow-up

Women who smoked and were severely obese with a body mass index (BMI) of 35 or more, were 6.6 times more likely to die during a 10-year follow-up than normal weight women who had never smoked according to a new study from the US’s National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

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Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Dec 03, 2008 7:24 am | [0] comments

WEIGHT AND MORTALITY

Normal weight former smoking men were 2.2 to 4.1 times more likely to die during 10 year follow-up

Men who normal weight with a body mass index (BMI) of 23.5 to 25 and who quit smoking at least 10 years earlier were 2.2 times more likely to die during a 10-year follow-up than normal weight women who had never smoked according to a new study from the US’s National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

Similar men who had quit smoking less than 10 years earlier were 4.1 times more likely to die during follow-up.

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Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Dec 03, 2008 6:04 am | [0] comments

WEIGHT AND MORTALITY

Normal weight former smoking women were 1.9 to 2.9 times more likely to die during 10 year follow-up

Women who normal weight with a body mass index (BMI) of 23.5 to 25 and who quit smoking at least 10 years earlier were 1.9 times more likely to die during a 10-year follow-up than normal weight women who had never smoked according to a new study from the US’s National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

Similar women who had quit smoking less than 10 years earlier were 2.9 times more likely to die during follow-up.

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Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Dec 03, 2008 6:02 am | [0] comments

WEIGHT AND MORTALITY

Normal-weight smoking men with BMI 23.5-25, 6.2 times more likely to die during 10 year follow-up

Men who were normal weight, that is had a body mass index (BMI) of 23.5 to 25, but who were current smokers, were 6.2 times more likely to die during a 10-year follow-up than normal weight men who had never smoked according to a new study from the US’s National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

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Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Dec 03, 2008 6:00 am | [0] comments

WEIGHT AND MORTALITY

Underweight smoking men with BMI less than 18.5, 8.4 times more likely to die during 10 yr follow-up

Men who were underweight with a body mass index (BMI) of less than 18.5 and who were current smokers, were 8.4 times more likely to die during a 10-year follow-up than normal weight men who had never smoked according to a new study from the US’s National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
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Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Dec 03, 2008 5:50 am | [0] comments

WEIGHT AND MORTALITY

Obese smoking men with BMI 35 or more, 8.1 times more likely to die

Men who were current smokers and severely obese with a body mass index (BMI) of 35 or more, were 8.1 times more likely to die during a 10-year follow-up than normal weight men who had never smoked according to a new study from the US’s National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
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Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Dec 03, 2008 5:40 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

WEIGHT AND MORTALITY

Overweight men with BMI 25-30, 11% more likely to die during 10 years than men with BMI of 23.5-25

Men who had never smoked, but were overweight, that is had a body mass index (BMI) of 25 to 30, were 11 percent more likely to die -- 1.11 times more likely -- during a 10-year follow-up than normal weight men who had never smoked with a BMI of 23.5 to 25 according to a new study from the US's National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

To put this another way, men who were normal weight with a BMI of 23.5 to 25, were 10 percent less likely to die than men who were overweight.

Comment: This is more evidence that the 2005 CDC Study by Flegal was WRONG

To me, this study provides additional evidence that there was a problem with the study done a couple years ago done by the US Centers for Disease Control which estimated that the obesity is associated with much fewer deaths in the US than previously estimated (111,000 versus 400,000).

It seemed obvious to me that the Flegal study was wrong when one of the tables in the paper showed that by their calculations that overweight people were less likely to die than normal weight people. To me, this was a big, huge red flag saying "Something is wrong with this study by Flegal (2005)!". Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Nov 19, 2008 11:17 am | [0] comments

WEIGHT AND MORTALITY

Obese men with BMI 30-35, 41% more likely to die during 10 years than men with BMI of 23.5-25

Men who had never smoked, but were obese with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 to 35 were 41 percent more likely to die -- 1.41 times more likely -- during a 10-year follow-up than normal weight men who had never smoked with a BMI of 23.5 to 25 according to a new study from the US's National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

To put this another way, men who were normal weight with a BMI of 23.5 to 25, were 29 percent less likely to die than men who were obese with a BMI of 30-35. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Nov 19, 2008 11:10 am | [0] comments

WEIGHT AND MORTALITY

Obese men w/ BMI over 35, 2.4 times more likely to die during 10 years than men with BMI of 23.5-25

Men who had never smoked, but were obese with a body mass index (BMI) of 35 or more were 144 percent more likely to die -- 2.44 times more likely -- during a 10-year follow-up than normal weight men who had never smoked with a BMI of 23.5 to 25 according to a new study from the US's National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

To put this another way, men who were normal weight with a BMI of 23.5 to 25, were 59 percent less likely to die than men who were obese with a BMI of 30-35. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Nov 19, 2008 11:00 am | [0] comments

WEIGHT AND MORTALITY

Overweight women with BMI 25-30, 14% more likely to die during 10 years than women w/BMI of 23.5-25

Women who who had never smoked, but were overweight, that is had a body mass index (BMI) of 25 to 30, were 14 percent more likely to die -- 1.14 times more likely -- during a 10-year follow-up than normal weight women who had never smoked with a BMI of 23.5 to 25 according to a new study from the US's National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

To put this another way, women who were normal weight with a BMI of 23.5 to 25, were 10 percent less likely to die than women who were overweight.

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Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Nov 19, 2008 9:31 am | [0] comments

WEIGHT AND MORTALITY

Obese women with BMI 30-35, 33% more likely to die during 10 years than women with BMI of 23.5-25

Women who had never smoked, but were obese with a BMI of 30- to 35, were 33 percent more likely to die -- 1.33 times more likely -- during a 10-year follow-up than normal weight women who had never smoked with a BMI of 23.5 to 25 according to a new study from the US's National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

To put this another way, women who were normal weight with a BMI of 23.5 to 25, were 25 percent less likely to die than women who were overweight.

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Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Nov 19, 2008 9:22 am | [0] comments

WEIGHT AND MORTALITY

Obese women w/BMI over 35, 2.2 times more likely to die during 10 years than women w/BMI of 23.5-25

Women who had never smoked, but were obese with a body mass index (BMI) of 35 or more were 118 percent more likely to die -- 2.2 times more likely -- during a 10-year follow-up than normal weight women who had never smoked with a BMI of 23.5 to 25 according to a new study from the US's National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

To put this another way, women who were normal weight with a BMI of 23.5 to 25, were 54 percent less likely to die than women who were obese with a BMI of 30-35. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Nov 19, 2008 9:17 am | [0] comments

WEIGHT AND MORTALITY

Lean men with BMI 18.5-23.5, 8% more likely to die during 10 years than men with BMI of 23.5-25

Lean men who had never smoked, but were obese with a BMI of 18.5 to 23.5, were 8 percent more likely to die -- 1.08 times more likely -- during a 10-year follow-up than normal weight men who had never smoked with a BMI of 23.5 to 25, although there was more than a 5 percent chance that the difference was due to random chance, according to a new study from the US's National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

To put this another way, men who were normal weight with a BMI of 23.5 to 25, were 15 percent less likely to die than lean men with a BMI of 18.5-23.5.

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Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Nov 19, 2008 9:08 am | [0] comments

WEIGHT AND MORTALITY

Lean women with BMI 18.5-23.5, 17% more likely to die during 10 years than women with BMI of 23.5-25

Lean women who had never smoked, but were obese with a BMI of 18.5 to 23.5, were 17 percent more likely to die -- 1.17 times more likely -- during a 10-year follow-up than normal weight women who had never smoked with a BMI of 23.5 to 25 according to a new study from the US's National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

To put this another way, women who were normal weight with a BMI of 23.5 to 25, were 15 percent less likely to die than lean women with a BMI of 18.5-23.5.

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Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Nov 19, 2008 9:02 am | [0] comments

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