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Monday, September 21, 2009

RICHARD MOORE, MD, PHD

Richard Moore, MD, PhD: Drugs are not the answer to hypertension

In 1986, professor and research scientist, Richard Moore, MD, PhD, showed in his book "The K Factor: Reversing and Preventing High Blood Pressure Without Drugs", that 95% of the cases of hypertension are due to a low ratio of potassium to sodium in the American diet.

“We did not emphasize it, but since you can't repair a dietary deficiency with a synthetic chemical [a drug] this clearly indicated that drugs are not the answer for hypertension," Dr. Moore noted.

Dr. Moore also notes that back in the 1980's, the largest blood pressure drug study to-date at that time, which included "17,000 people over a 5-year period, demonstrated that lowering blood pressure with drugs had zero effect on over-all mortality!" Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Sep 21, 2009 12:54 pm | [0] comments

Monday, August 31, 2009

BLOOD PRESSURE DRUGS

Women taking a diuretic plus a beta blocker were 21% MORE likely to die of cardiovascular disease

Women taking a diuretic plus a beta blocker were 21% more likely to die of cardiovascular disease during a 5.9 year follow-up than women taking NO blood pressure medicines even though the average systolic pressure was 15 points LOWER in the drug group than the no drug group (134 mm Hg vs 149 mm Hg) according to a 2004 study.


To say this the other way, women taking NO blood pressure drugs were 18% LESS likely to die of cardiovascular disease during a 5.9 year follow-up than women taking a diuretic plus a beta blocker.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Aug 31, 2009 12:32 pm | [0] comments

BLOOD PRESSURE DRUGS

Women taking a diuretic pus an ACE Inhibitor were 12% MORE likely to die of cardiovascular disease

Women taking a diuretic plus an ACE inhibitor were 12% more likely to die of cardiovascular disease during a 5.9 year follow-up than women taking NO blood pressure medicines even though the average systolic pressure was 16 points LOWER in the drug group than the no drug group (133 mm Hg vs 149 mm Hg) according to a 2004 study.


To say this the other way, women taking NO blood pressure drugs were 11% LESS likely to die of cardiovascular disease during a 5.9 year follow-up than women taking a diuretic plus an ACE inhibitor.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Aug 31, 2009 7:32 am | [0] comments

Friday, August 14, 2009

BLOOD PRESSURE DRUGS

Women taking a diuretic + calcium channel blocker 136% MORE likely to die of cardiovascular disease

Women taking a diuretic plus a calcium channel blocker were 2.4 times MORE likely (136% more likely) to die of cardiovascular disease during a 5.9 year follow-up than women taking NO blood pressure medicines even though the average systolic pressure was 11 points LOWER in the drug group than the no drug group (138 mm Hg vs 149 mm Hg) according to a 2004 study.


To say this the other way, women taking NO blood pressure medicines were 58% LESS likely to die of cardiovascular disease during a 5.9 year follow-up than women taking a diuretic plus a calcium channel blocker.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Aug 14, 2009 10:43 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, August 12, 2009

BLOOD PRESSURE DRUGS

Women on calcium channel blockers were 74% MORE likely to die of cardiovascular disease

Women taking a calcium channel blocker were 74% MORE likely to die of cardiovascular disease during a 5.9 year follow-up than women taking NO blood pressure drugs even though the average systolic pressure was 10 points LOWER in the drug group than the no drug group (139 mm Hg vs 149 mm Hg) according to a 2004 study.


To say this the other way, women taking NO blood pressure medicines were 43% LESS likely to die of cardiovascular disease during the 5.9 year follow-up than women taking a calcium channel blocker.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Aug 12, 2009 8:26 am | [0] comments

BLOOD PRESSURE DRUGS

Women taking an ACE Inhibitor 4% MORE likely to die of cardiovascular disease than women on NO drugs

Women taking an ACE Inhibitor were 4% MORE likely to die of cardiovascular disease during the 5.9 year follow-up than women taking NO blood pressure medicines even though the average systolic pressure was 12 points LOWER in the drug group than the no drug group (137 mm Hg vs 149 mm Hg) according to a 2004 study.

To say this the other way, women taking NO blood pressure medicines were 4% LESS likely to die of cardiovascular disease during the 5.9 year follow-up than women taking an ACE Inhibitor. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Aug 12, 2009 7:10 am | [0] comments

Saturday, August 08, 2009

BLOOD PRESSURE DRUGS

Women taking a diuretic were 9% MORE likely to die of cardiovascular disease than with no drugs

Women, 50- to 79-years-old with high blood pressure and no history of cardiovascular disease, who were taking a diuretic to lower their blood pressure were 9% MORE likely to die of cardiovascular disease during a 5.9 year follow-up than women of the same age who also had hypertension but were taking NO blood pressure medicines even though the average systolic pressure was 13 points LOWER in the drug group than the NO drug group (136 mm Hg vs 149 mm Hg) according to a 2004 study.


Let me say this the other way.


Older women with hypertension who were NOT taking blood pressure drugs were 8% LESS likely to die of cardiovascular disease during a 5.9 year follow-up than women of the same age who were taking a diuretic even though the average systolic pressure of the women taking NO blood pressure medicines was 13 points HIGHER than those taking a diuretic (149 mm Hg vs 136 mm Hg).

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sat, Aug 08, 2009 11:11 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, August 05, 2009

BLOOD PRESSURE DRUGS

Women taking a beta blocker were 15% LESS likely to die of cardiovascular disease than with no drugs

Women taking a beta blocker were 15% less likely to die of cardiovascular disease during the 5.9 year follow-up than women taking NO blood pressure medicines according to a 2004 study.

The average systolic pressure was 11 points LOWER in the drug group than the no drug group (136 mm Hg vs 149 mm Hg).

To say this the other way, women taking women taking NO blood pressure medicines were 17% MORE likely to die of cardiovascular disease during the 5.9 year follow-up than women taking a beta blocker.

(YouTube videos are limited to 10 minutes, so I had to split the video into 2 parts.) Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Aug 05, 2009 5:19 pm | [0] comments

Monday, June 22, 2009

UCLA’s Sid Port #1: The belief that lower your blood pressure, the lower your risk of death is WRONG

The belief that "the higher your blood pressure, the higher your risk of death, and the lower your blood pressure, the lower the risk of death" is WRONG.

This according to a brilliant paper from UCLA statistician, Sid Port, PhD. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Jun 22, 2009 2:03 pm | [0] comments

UCLA’s Sid Port #1: The belief that lower your blood pressure, the lower your risk of death is WRONG

The belief that "the higher your blood pressure, the higher your risk of death, and the lower your blood pressure, the lower the risk of death" is WRONG.

This according to a brilliant paper from UCLA statistician, Sid Port, PhD. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Jun 22, 2009 2:03 pm | [0] comments

UCLA’s Sid Port #1: The belief that lower your blood pressure, the lower your risk of death is WRONG

The belief that "the higher your blood pressure, the higher your risk of death, and the lower your blood pressure, the lower the risk of death" is WRONG.

This according to a brilliant paper from UCLA statistician, Sid Port, PhD. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Jun 22, 2009 2:03 pm | [0] comments

UCLA’s Sid Port #1: The belief that lower your blood pressure, the lower your risk of death is WRONG

The belief that "the higher your blood pressure, the higher your risk of death, and the lower your blood pressure, the lower the risk of death" is WRONG.

This according to a brilliant paper from UCLA statistician, Sid Port, PhD. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Jun 22, 2009 2:03 pm | [0] comments

Saturday, June 20, 2009

LOSARTAN

Editorial on blood pressure drug Cozaar (losartan) is deceptive and disturbing notes Franz Messeri

[A statement made in a editorial about the blood pressure drug Cozaar (losartan)] is "disturbing." …

"The authors seemingly want us to believe… [this] deceptive statement."

-- Franz Messerli, MD, European Heart Journal, 2003. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sat, Jun 20, 2009 11:57 am | [0] comments

Thursday, June 18, 2009

ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTOR BLOCKER

Cozaar (losartan) reduces strokes by 40%, but does NOT reduce heart attacks

The blood pressure medicine “... Cozaar [losartan]... [reduced strokes by 40%, but] did NOT reduce [heart attacks]....”


Between Cozaar and the beta blocker atenolol, Cozaar, some might argue, is only the lesser of two evils.

— Franz Messerli, MD, European Heart Journal, 2003. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jun 18, 2009 1:39 pm | [0] comments

BETA BLOCKERS

Beta blockers increase the risk of weight gain and diabetes

“... beta blocker therapy has been shown to cause... weight gain... and to significantly increase the risk of developing diabetes.”

— Franz Messerli, MD, European Heart Journal, 2003. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jun 18, 2009 11:21 am | [0] comments

BETA BLOCKERS

Beta blockers do NOT reduce heart attacks or death in people over 60

“... [In] patients over the age of 60, beta blockers did NOT reduce [heart attacks], cardiovascular mortality or [the total risk of death].”
— Franz Messerli, MD, European Heart Journal, 2003. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jun 18, 2009 10:58 am | [0] comments

BETA BLOCKERS

Strokes were 2-4 times more common with beta blockers than a diuretic

... [T]he risk of strokes was between two and four times higher in middle-aged patients on [the beta blocker] atenolol compared to [a diuretic].

— Franz Messerli, MD, European Heart Journal, 2003. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jun 18, 2009 9:35 am | [0] comments

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

BETA BLOCKERS

Beta blockers increase the risk of suicide by 60%

Blood pressure medicine called beta blockers increase the risk of suicide by 60 percent as noted in a Letter to the Editor published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, Jun 16, 2009 2:11 pm | [0] comments

Monday, August 25, 2008

MEDICAL EXPENSES

Medical expenses in those with diabetes, dyslipidemia or hypertension 30-60% higher in obese people

Annual medical expenses of obese people with diabetes, dyslipidemia (elevated LDL cholesterol, elevated triglycerides or low HDL cholesterol), or hypertension are 30-60 percent higher than normal weight people with these conditions according to a paper from the University of Colorado in Denver, Colorado, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Aug 25, 2008 11:34 am | [0] comments

LOST DAYS OF WORK

Obese people with diabetes, dyslipidemia or hypertension lost 2-6 more work days than non-obese

Obese people with diabetes, dyslipidemia (elevated LDL cholesterol, elevated triglycerides or low HDL cholesterol), or hypertension missed 2-6 more days of work than normal weight people with these conditions, and 5-9 more days of work than normal weight people without these conditions according to a paper from the University of Colorado in Denver, Colorado, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Aug 25, 2008 11:29 am | [0] comments

Friday, January 18, 2008

HYPERTENSION

85% of hypertension in people who are overweight

Six out of seven people with hypertension ( 85 percent ) are overweight with a body mass index ( BMI ) exceeding 25 according to a report from the Government Office for Science in England. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Jan 18, 2008 6:55 am | [0] comments

HYPERTENSION

66% of hypertension due to excess weight

Two-thirds ( 66 percent ) of hypertension is due to excess weight according to a report from the Government Office for Science in England. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Jan 18, 2008 6:43 am | [0] comments

HYPERTENSION

Obesity increases the risk of hypertension 5-fold

Obesity increase the risk of hypertension 5-fold according to a report from the Government Office for Science in England. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Jan 18, 2008 6:36 am | [0] comments

Tuesday, August 07, 2007

SNORING

Snoring is associated with a 50% increased risk of hypertension independent of body weight

Habitual snoring is associated with a 50 percent greater risk of developing hypertension during the next two years according to a new study from researchers at Korea University in Seoul, Korea. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, Aug 07, 2007 12:54 am | [0] comments

Friday, May 20, 2005

BLOOD PRESSURE

22 lbs weight loss reduces blood pressure 6 points systolic, 4.6 points diastolic

A 22 pound weight loss reduces blood pressure an average of 6.0 / 4.6 mmHg according to a new study from the University of Aberdeen in Aberdeen, United Kingdom. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, May 20, 2005 7:21 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, December 15, 2004

U.S. NIH’s Obesity Guidelines Part 20: Weight loss lowers blood pressure

A weight loss of 22 pounds induced by lifestyle changes lowers systolic blood pressure an average of 7 points, and diastolic blood pressure 3 points according to a 1987 meta-analysis of five studies of hypertensive patients. (p. 29) Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Dec 15, 2004 3:12 am | [0] comments

Thursday, December 09, 2004

U.S. NIH’s Obesity Guidelines Part 3: Hypertension

Hypertension is 2.1 more common in men and 1.9 times more common in women with a BMI of 30 or more compared to those with a BMI of 25 or less according to the U.S. NIH's Obesity Guidelines (p. 12). Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Dec 09, 2004 4:49 am | [0] comments

Monday, October 18, 2004

Hypertension twice as common in obese people

Hypertension is twice as common in people who are obese as people of normal weight and 30-50 percent less likely to be controlled according to a new study. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Oct 18, 2004 6:06 am | [0] comments

Monday, October 11, 2004

Obesity undiagnosed in 23% of cases

Obesity is undiagnosed in 22.9 percent of U.S. adults according to a new study. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Oct 11, 2004 6:53 am | [0] comments

Thursday, September 30, 2004

Hypertension: 10 lbs weight gain in women increases the risk 20%

In women, each 10 pound weight gain increases the risk of hypertension by 20 percent according to a recent study. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Sep 30, 2004 7:28 am | [0] comments

Thursday, September 23, 2004

Blood Pressure: Abdominal obesity increases the risk 44-98% in men, 104-198% in women

Abdominal obesity increases the risk of elevated blood pressure by 44-98 percent in men, and 104-198 percent in women according to a new study. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Sep 23, 2004 6:46 am | [0] comments

Sunday, September 05, 2004

Diet plus exercise better at lowering blood pressure, but diet alone causes more weight loss

Diet plus exercise is better at lowering blood pressure, but diet alone causes slightly more weight loss according to a study of overweight people with high blood pressure and metabolic syndrome (Syndrome X). Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sun, Sep 05, 2004 8:41 am | [0] comments

Friday, August 06, 2004

Hypertension: Extremely obesity (BMI greater than 40) increases the risk 6.4 fold

Extreme obesity, that is having a body mass index of 40 or more, increases the risk of high blood pressure 6.4-fold as self-reported by people who were surveyed according to a paper from researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Aug 06, 2004 3:25 pm | [0] comments

Monday, July 19, 2004

What is the cost of hypertension related to obesity and overweight in the U.S.?

$4.1 billion according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. This is 17 percent of the total cost of hypertension. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, Jul 19, 2004 3:42 pm | [0] comments

Thursday, July 15, 2004

What is the prevalence of hypertension in people who are overweight?

In men, hypertension is present in
  • 15 percent of men with a body mass index (BMI) of less than 25 (normal weight),

  • 22 percent of men with a body mass index (BMI) of 25-27, and

  • 27 percent of men with a BMI of 27-30.


In women, hypertension is present in
  • 15 percent of women with a BMI of less than 25,

  • 28 percent of women with a BMI of 25-27, and

  • 33 percent of women with a BMI of 27-30.
Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Jul 15, 2004 4:28 pm | [0] comments

Friday, June 11, 2004

Hydralazine-treated rabbits ate less, weighed less, and had less bodyfat

Rabbits given the antihypertensive drug hydralazine ate less, weighed less, and had a lower percent bodyfat according to a study from researchers at the University of North Texas Health in Fort Worth. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Jun 11, 2004 12:20 pm | [0] comments

Tuesday, June 08, 2004

Obesity increases the risk of hypertension in adolescents

HYPERTENSION was 8.5 times as prevalent in overweight adolescents as in their lean peers according to a recent study. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, Jun 08, 2004 10:38 am | [0] comments

Tuesday, June 01, 2004

Treating Hypothalamic Pituitary Dysfunction (HPD): By William Wilson, M.D.

In his interview, William Wilson, M.D., discussed a condition he has named Hypothalamic Pituitary Dysfunction, or HPD for short. In this article he provides an outline for diagnosis, treatment and examples of patients he has treated. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, Jun 01, 2004 8:30 am | [0] comments

Monday, May 24, 2004

Obesity and hypertension: 5 lbs weight loss can lower diastolic blood pressure 7 points

Losing 5 pounds decreases diastolic pressure by 7 mmHg and losing 10 pounds reduced it by 11.6 mmHg according to a study by McCarron and Reusser (1996).
Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Mon, May 24, 2004 9:10 am | [0] comments

Thursday, April 01, 2004

Diseases associated with obesity

"Clinicians are likely to encounter morbidity more frequently among their patients with elevated BMI, even those patients in the overweight category [with a body mass index greater than 25]," concludes a recent study by researchers from Tufts University, Harvard School of Public Health, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Apr 01, 2004 5:59 am | [0] comments

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