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Thursday, April 12, 2012

FRUCTOSE VS GLUCOSE

3 fruits to eat: strawberries, peaches, cantaloupe; 3 to avoid: bananas, apples, mangos; Stanhope

Three fruits to eat with less than 5 grams of fructose per 100 grams of fruit as recommended by sugar researcher, Kimber Stanhope, PhD, are:

  • strawberries

  • peaches

  • cantaloupe


Three fruits to avoid because they contain higher levels of fructose are:

  • bananas

  • apples

  • mangos


Kimber Stanhope, PhD is a researcher from the University of California at Davis, who has done studies comparing the effects of consuming glucose vs fructose, and who was interviewed on ReachMD.com. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Thu, Apr 12, 2012 11:30 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

FRUCTOSE VS GLUCOSE

Fructose causes same amount of weight gain and fat gain as glucose notes Kimber Stanhope, PhD

Fructose and glucose cause the same amount of weight gain and same amount of fat gain notes Kimber Stanhope, PhD, a researcher from the University of California at Davis, who has done studies comparing the effects of consuming glucose vs fructose, who was interviewed on ReachMD.com. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Apr 11, 2012 4:05 pm | [0] comments

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

SUGAR / FRUCTOSE

Sugar can make some cancers grow including breast cancer and colon cancer says Lewis Cantley, PhD

Dr. Sanjay Gupta: If you limit your sugar you decrease your chances of developing cancer?


Lewis Cantley, PhD: Absolutely.


Cantley, a Harvard professor and the head of the Beth Israel Deaconess Cancer Center, says when we eat or drink sugar, it causes a sudden spike in the hormone insulin, which can serve as a catalyst to fuel certain types of cancers.


Lewis Cantley: What we're beginning to learn is that insulin can cause adverse effects in the various tissues. And of particular concern is cancer.


Why? Nearly a third of some common cancers -- including breast and colon cancers -- have something called insulin receptors on their surface. Insulin binds to these receptors and signals the tumor to start consuming glucose [which allows it to grow].


Lewis Cantley: Every cell in our body needs glucose to survive. But the trouble is, these cancer cells also use it to grow. So if you happen to have the tumor that has insulin receptors on it then it will get stimulated to take up the glucose that's in the bloodstream rather than go into fat or muscle, the glucose goes into the tumor. And the tumor uses it to grow.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Apr 10, 2012 11:59 am | [0] comments

SUGAR / FRUCTOSE

Overeating sugar causes the body to build up a tolerance & causes you to desire more, Eric Stice PhD

Dr. Sanjay Gupta: So far be it for people to realize this 'cause sugar is everywhere, but you're saying this is one of the most addictive substances possibly that we have?

Eric Stice, PhD: It certainly is very good at firing the reward regions in our brain.

Eric Stice says by scanning hundreds of volunteers, he's learned that people who frequently drink sodas or eat ice cream or other sweet foods may be building up a tolerance, much like drug users do. As strange as it sounds, that means the more you eat, the less you feel the reward. The result: you eat more than ever.

Eric Stice: If you overeat these on a regular basis it causes changes in the brain that basically it blunts your reward region response to the food, so then you eat more and more to achieve the same satisfaction you felt originally. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Apr 10, 2012 11:57 am | [0] comments

SUGAR / FRUCTOSE

Don’t eat sugar says cancer researcher, Lewis Cantley, PhD

Lewis Cantley's research team is working on developing drugs that will cut off the glucose supply to cancer cells and keep them from growing. But until there's a breakthrough, Cantley's advice? Don't eat sugar. And if you must, keep it to a minimum.


Cantley, a Harvard professor and the head of the Beth Israel Deaconess Cancer Center, says when we eat or drink sugar, it causes a sudden spike in the hormone insulin, which can serve as a catalyst to fuel certain types of cancers.


Lewis Cantley: What we're beginning to learn is that insulin can cause adverse effects in the various tissues. And of particular concern is cancer.


Why? Nearly a third of some common cancers -- including breast and colon cancers -- have something called insulin receptors on their surface. Insulin binds to these receptors and signals the tumor to start consuming glucose [which allows it to grow].


Lewis Cantley: Every cell in our body needs glucose to survive. But the trouble is, these cancer cells also use it to grow. So if you happen to have the tumor that has insulin receptors on it then it will get stimulated to take up the glucose that's in the bloodstream rather than go into fat or muscle, the glucose goes into the tumor. And the tumor uses it to grow.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Apr 10, 2012 11:54 am | [0] comments

Monday, April 09, 2012

SUGAR / FRUCTOSE

Is Sugar Toxic? Yes, said Robert Lustig, MD on ‘60 Minutes’ on April 1, 2012

"The chances are good that sugar is a bigger part of your daily diet than you may realize which is why our story tonight is so important," Dr. Sanjay Gupta noted on the television show '60 Minutes' on April 1, 2012.


"New research coming out of some of America's most respected institutions is starting to find that sugar, the way many people are eating it today, is a toxin and could be a driving force behind some of this country's leading killers, including heart disease."

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Apr 09, 2012 1:35 pm | [0] comments

SUGAR / FRUCTOSE

Sugar causes obesity, type II diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease says Robert Lustig, MD

Dr. Sanjay Gupta: What are all these various diseases that you say are linked to sugar?


Dr. Robert Lustig: Obesity, type II diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease itself.


Lustig says the American lifestyle is killing us.


Dr. Sanjay Gupta: And most of it you say is preventable?


Dr. Robert Lustig: Seventy-five percent of it is preventable.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Apr 09, 2012 1:20 pm | [0] comments

SUGAR / FRUCTOSE

Table sugar (sucrose) is just as bad as high-fructose corn syrup says Robert Lustig, MD

Dr. Sanjay Gupta: Is it worse than just table sugar?


Dr. Robert Lustig: No. 'Cause it's the exact same. They are basically equivalent. The problem is they're both bad. They're both equally toxic.


Since the 1970s, sugar consumption has gone down nearly 40 percent, but high fructose corn syrup has more than made up the difference. Dr. Lustig says they are both toxic because they both contain fructose -- that's what makes them sweet and irresistible.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Apr 09, 2012 1:10 pm | [0] comments

Tuesday, March 06, 2012

INSULIN & FRUCTOSE

Focusing on eating less and exercising more has set up back says Robert Lustig, MD

When asked about the idea that overweight people merely need to eat less and exercise more, Robert Lustig, MD says in this 15 minute video interview, "I think that [message] is what has set us back so severely in this entire disaster [of increasing obesity] is this concept "Eat less, exercise more."

"First of all, people can't eat less, and people can't exercise more," Lustig continues.


Lustig says that he believes that there are biochemical forces driving people to overeat and under-exercise, and he believes that one of the major forces is excess insulin caused by excess fructose consumption.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Mar 06, 2012 12:12 pm | [0] comments

Monday, March 28, 2011

HIGH-FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

Female rats given high-fructose corn syrup gained 100% in 7 months vs 77% with rat chow only

Growing female rats given 24-hour access to water containing 8% high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in addition to water and given access to regular rat chow, gained 100% of their body weight in seven (7) months compared to a normal weight gain of 77% for rats given access to rat chow and water only according to a study from researchers at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Mar 28, 2011 4:38 pm | [0] comments

HIGH-FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

Male rats given high-fructose corn syrup gained 157% in 6 months vs 102% with rat chow only

Growing male rats given 24-hour access to water containing 8% high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in addition to water and given access to regular rat chow, gained 157% of their body weight in six months compared to a normal weight gain of 102% for rats given access to rat chow and water only according to a study from researchers at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Mar 28, 2011 4:15 pm | [0] comments

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

STRESS & FRUCTOSE

Stress and high-fat, high-sugar diet decreases stimulation of fat-burning adrenaline receptors

Chronic stress and a high-fat, high-sugar diet decrease stimulation adrenaline receptors involved in burning fat and reducing appetite notes a recent paper. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Sep 29, 2010 7:34 am | [0] comments

Tuesday, July 06, 2010

ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS

Sugar is more potent than artificial sweeteners at turning off brain’s desire for sweetness

"Another recent study, in humans [ by Frank et al, 2008 ], revealed that sugar is more potent than low-calorie sweeteners in stimulating brain areas related to expectation and satisfaction, thereby turning off the desire for more sweetness," notes noted Tracy Hampton in an article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

"We thought that sugar and artificial sweeteners, which both activate sweet receptors in the tongue, would both activate the same pathways in the brain," said principal investigator Walter Kaye, MD, of the University of Pittsburgh's Department of Psychiatry, Hampton quotes in her article. "They turned out to not be the same," [ Dr. Kaye ] added.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Jul 06, 2010 10:46 am | [1] comments

Sugar consumption causes a weight gain of 3.5 lbs; artificial sweetner a weight loss of 2.2 lbs

Overweight men and women given sucrose (sugar) supplements, provided mostly as beverages, gained an average of 3.5 pounds in two-and-one-half months compared to a weight loss of 2.2 pounds for a group of people given artificial sweetners according to a recent study. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Jul 06, 2010 9:44 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, June 16, 2010

SUGAR

Sugar may be addictive for some people according to a rat study

Sugar may be addictive in some people according to a study done on rats from researchers at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Jun 16, 2010 10:22 am | [0] comments

SUGAR VS ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS

Sugar-sweetened soda causes weight gain of 3.5 lbs vs weight loss of 2.2 lbs w/ artificial sweetener

Overweight men and women gained an average of 3.5 pounds in two-and-a-half months drinking sugar-sweetened soda compared to an average weight loss of 2.2 pounds for those drinking artificially-sweetened sodas according to a recent study. This is a difference of 5.7 pounds between the groups Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Jun 16, 2010 9:54 am | [2] comments

SUGAR INTAKE

Half of sugar intake in the U.S. comes from soft drinks

Added sugar accounts for an estimated 15.8 percent of calories in the U.S., and almost half (47 percent) comes from soft drinks as noted in a paper from Harvard about sugar intake and weight gain. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Jun 16, 2010 8:17 am | [0] comments

SUGAR ADDICTION

Sugar addiction: Rats prefer sugar to cocaine

When rats were allowed to choose between water sweetened with sugar (sucrose) or the artificial sweetener saccharin compared with intravenous cocaine, 94 percent of them chose the sweetened water to the cocaine according to a study from researchers at the University Bordeaux in Bordeaux, France. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Jun 16, 2010 7:52 am | [0] comments

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

SUGARY BEVERAGES

Each additional serving of sugar-sweetened drink increases risk of obesity in 12-year-olds by 60%

Among children who were about 12-years-old, each additional serving of sugar-sweetened drink increased the risk of obesity by 60 percent, and increased body mass index (BMI) by 0.24 units according to a study by David Ludwig and others at Harvard University.

This was after adjusting for differences in height, diet, lifestyle and demographics. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Sep 29, 2009 10:30 am | [0] comments

Monday, September 28, 2009

SODA

One soda per day increases risk of overweight in adults by 27%, UCLA study found

"[A]dults who drink a soda or more per day are 27 percent more likely to be overweight than those who do not drink sodas, regardless of income or ethnicity," according to a a report from researchers from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and the California Center for Public Health Advocacy.

The results were based on more than 40,000 interviews conducted by the California Health Interview Surveys. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 2:16 pm | [0] comments

HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

Consumption of consumption of high-fructose corn syrup increased 10-fold between 1970 and 1990

"The consumption of HFCS increased > 1000% [10-fold] between 1970 and 1990, far exceeding the changes in intake of any other food or food group," according to a paper by obesity researcher George Bray and others. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 1:25 pm | [0] comments

SUGAR

Americans consume 355 calories per day as added sugar, notes American Heart Association


"In 2001 to 2004, the usual intake of added sugars for Americans was 22.2 teaspoons per day (355 calories per day)," according to a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 1:25 pm | [0] comments

HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

The average American consumes 132 calories of high-fructose corn syrup per day

According to their "most conservative estimate", the average American older than 2-years-old consume 132 calories as high-fructose corn syrup according to a paper by obesity researcher George Bray and others. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 1:19 pm | [0] comments

HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

The top one-fifth of Americans consumes 316 calories of high-fructose corn syrup per day

The one-fifth of Americans 2-years or older who consume the most caloric sweeteners ingest an average of 316 calories per day according to a paper by obesity researcher George Bray and others. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 1:04 pm | [0] comments

HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

Fructose does not stimulate insulin secretion or enhance leptin production like glucose does

"The digestion, absorption, and metabolism of fructose differ from those of glucose," notes a paper by obesity researcher George Bray and others.

[LIver] metabolism of fructose favors de novo lipogenesis [that is, the conversion of carbohydrates to fat].

"In addition, unlike glucose, fructose does not stimulate insulin secretion or enhance leptin production," they note.

"Because insulin and leptin act as key afferent signals in the regulation of food intake and body weight, this suggests that dietary fructose may contribute to increased energy intake and weight gain."

Comment: A recent study also found that fructose increases appetite, whereas glucose decreases appetite.

This is because fructose metabolism requires an enzyme that depletes ATP, the universal energy molecule, whereas, glucose increases ATP. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 12:51 pm | [0] comments

HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

Average soda size is 2.5 times larger today than in the 1950’s, 16 oz vs 6.5 oz

The average side soda sold today (2009) compared to those sold in the 1950s is 2.5 times larger -- 16 ounces versus 6.5 ounces -- according to a a report from researchers from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and the California Center for Public Health Advocacy. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 12:44 pm | [0] comments

HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

Two-thirds (66%) of all high fructose corn syrup consumed in the United States is through beverages

Two-thirds (66%) of all high fructose corn syrup consumed in the United States is through beverages according to a paper by obesity researcher George Bray and others.
Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 12:40 pm | [0] comments

HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

Calories from milk reduced 38% in the US from 1977 to 2001

Between 1977-78 and 1999-2001, "Overall, energy intake from [milk] was reduced by 38%," according to a paper by researcher at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 12:36 pm | [0] comments

HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

Calories from sweetened beverages increased 2.4 fold from 1977 to 2001

Between 1977-78 and 1999-2001, "Overall, energy intake from sweetened beverages increased 135% [2.4-fold]," according to a paper by researcher at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 12:36 pm | [0] comments

SUGARY BEVERAGES

Calories from sweetened beverages plus milk increased calories by 278 per day from 1977 to 2001

Between 1977-78 and 1999-2001, "Overall, energy intake from sweetened beverages [including a 38% reduction in calories from milk resulted in]... a 278 total calorie increase," according to a paper by researcher at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Sep 28, 2009 12:29 pm | [0] comments

Monday, April 06, 2009

Eliminating one sugar-sweetened drink per day caused a weight loss of 1.1 pounds after six months, .

Eliminating one sugar-sweetened drink per day caused a weight loss of 1.1 pounds after six months, and 1.4 pounds after a year-and-a-half according to a new study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Apr 06, 2009 1:49 pm | [0] comments

Thursday, September 18, 2008

SUGARY BEVERAGES

Only 7-15% of sugar-sweetened beverages in the US consumed at school

"On a typical weekday, 55% to 70% of all sugar-sweetened beverage calories were consumed in the home environment, and 7% to 15% occurred in schools according to a paper by researchers from Columbia University in New York, USA.

"Schools are a limited source for sugar-sweetened beverages, suggesting that initiatives to restrict sugar-sweetened beverage sales in schools may have an only marginal impact on overall consumption," the authors of the paper concluded.
Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Thu, Sep 18, 2008 5:39 am | [0] comments

SUGARY BEVERAGES

Calories from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juice: 242 calories in 1994, 270 in 2004

The average number of calories consumed in the U.S. per capita from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100 percent fruit juice increased from 242 calories per day in 1988-1994 to 270 calories per day in 1999-2004 according to a paper by researchers from Columbia University in New York, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Thu, Sep 18, 2008 5:19 am | [0] comments

SUGARY BEVERAGES

Calories from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juice in 2-5 year-olds in US: 176 calories

In 1999-2004, U.S. children 2- to 5-years-old consumed an average of 176 calories from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100 percent fruit juice according to a paper by researchers from Columbia University in New York, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Thu, Sep 18, 2008 5:15 am | [0] comments

SUGARY BEVERAGES

Calories from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juice in 6-11 year-olds in US: 229 calories

In 1999-2004, U.S. children 6- to 11-years-old consumed an average of 229 calories from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100 percent fruit juice according to a paper by researchers from Columbia University in New York, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Thu, Sep 18, 2008 5:11 am | [0] comments

SUGARY BEVERAGES

Calories from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juice in 12-19 year-olds in US: 356 calories

In 1999-2004, U.S. children 12- to 19-years-old consumed an average of 356 calories from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100 percent fruit juice according to a paper by researchers from Columbia University in New York, USA.

"Children and adolescents today derive 10% to 15% of total calories from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juice," the authors of the paper concluded. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Thu, Sep 18, 2008 5:06 am | [0] comments

Thursday, August 21, 2008

SUGAR

Consumption of added sugars in the U.S. has increased 22% since early 1980’s

The average consumption of added sugars in the U.S. increased 22 percent from the early 1980's to 2000 according to a report titled F as in Fat: How Obesity Policies Are Failing in America, 2008 from the Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Thu, Aug 21, 2008 7:50 am | [0] comments

Monday, July 14, 2008

SUCROSE

High sucrose intake, mostly as sugary sodas, causes weight gain of 3.5 lbs in 2.5 months

Overweight men and women fed a high-sucrose diet, mostly as sugary soft drinks, containing an average of 28 percent of their calories as sucrose (152 grams or 608 calories) gained 3.5 pounds in two-and-a-half months compared to weight loss of 2.2 pounds for those given the artificial sweetener aspartame (NutraSweet) according to a study by Arnie Astrup and colleagues from The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University in Frederiksberg, Denmark.

The high-sucrose group increased their calorie intake by an average of 382 calories by the end of the study. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Jul 14, 2008 3:24 pm | [0] comments

Friday, February 29, 2008

SWEETENED BEVERAGES

Replacing sweetened beverages with water reduces calorie intake by 200 calories per day

Women who replaced all sweetened caloric beverages with water, reduced their calorie intake by an average of 200 calories per day according to a new study. This effect was sustained for at least a year, and probably indefinitely. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Fri, Feb 29, 2008 9:13 am | [0] comments

Tuesday, July 17, 2007

SUGAR vs HIGH-FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

Sucrose-sweetened vs high-fructose sweetened colas have the same effect on hunger

"We found no differences between sucrose- and high-fructose corn syrup-sweetened colas in perceived sweetness, hunger and satiety profiles, or energy intakes at lunch," concludes a new study from researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Jul 17, 2007 1:22 am | [0] comments

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