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Monday, June 04, 2007

SUGAR

HIgh sugar intake not associated with obesity

High sugar diets are not associated with obesity according to an analysis of the Dietary and Nutritional Survey of British Adults. In fact, just the opposite. People who ate the most sugar were the leanest. This is not the first study to find this. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Mon, Jun 04, 2007 2:34 am | [0] comments

Thursday, November 09, 2006

PANCREATIC CANCER

High sugar intake increases risk of pancreatic cancer by 51-93%

A high sugar intake increases the risk of pancreatic cancer according to a study from Sweden. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Thu, Nov 09, 2006 3:52 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, August 09, 2006

SODA & WEIGHT GAIN

Women gained an extra 10 pounds in four years by drinking a soda per day

Women who increased their soda intake from one per week to one per day gained an average of 10.3 pounds more than women who did not increase their intake during the years of 1991-1995, and 9.2 pounds more during the years of 1995-1999 notes the study from Harvard on sugar intake and weight gain. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Aug 09, 2006 3:53 am | [0] comments

SUGARY DRINKS / CHILDHOOD OBESITY

Each additional sugary beverage increase risk of obesity by 60%

Each additional serving of a sugary beverage is associated with an increase in a child's body mass index (BMI) by 0.24 units and an increase in the odds of obesity by 60 percent as noted in a paper from Harvard University on sugar intake and weight gain. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Aug 09, 2006 3:43 am | [0] comments

HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

The increase in high-fructose corn syrup mirrors rise in obesity

"[T]he increased consumption of HFCS, the prevailing sweetener used to flavor calorically sweetened beverages in the United States, has been found to mirror the growth of the obesity epidemic," notes a paper from Harvard researchers in a paper on sugar intake and weight gain. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Wed, Aug 09, 2006 3:33 am | [0] comments

Tuesday, August 08, 2006

SUGAR INTAKE

Those who drink soda are more likely to be overweight; 70% vs 47% in women, 77% vs 58% in men

A larger percentage of men and women who drank at least one soda per week were overweight than those who drank less than one soda per week as noted in a paper from Harvard about sugar intake and weight gain. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Aug 08, 2006 4:35 am | [0] comments

SUGAR INTAKE

One 12 ounce soda per day could cause 15 lbs weight gain per year

One 12-ounce soda in the U.S. contains 150 calories and 40-50 grams of sugar sugar in the form of high-fructose corn syrup, equal to 10 tablespoons of sugar. Adding one soda per day to your diet without any other changes could cause a weight gain of 15 pounds in a year. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Aug 08, 2006 3:35 am | [0] comments

SUGAR INTAKE

Soft drink consumption has increased 2.4-fold from 1977 to 2001

Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, including sodas, soft drinks, colas, fruit drinks, lemonade and iced tea, has increased 2.4-fold -- an increase of 135 percent -- from 1977 to 2001 notes a paper from Harvard on sugar intake and weight gain. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Aug 08, 2006 3:25 am | [0] comments

SUGAR INTAKE

Percent of calories from sweeteners has increased in the past twenty years from 13% to 16%

Between 1977 and 1996, the percent of calories from sweeteners increased from 13 percent to 16 percent according to a study from Harvard on sugar and weight gain. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Aug 08, 2006 2:45 am | [0] comments

Sunday, March 05, 2006

METABOLISM

Boosting metabolism: Replacing fat with simple sugar raises metabolism 7%

Replacing fat in the diet with simple sugars increases metabolism according to a recent study. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Sun, Mar 05, 2006 1:11 pm | [0] comments

Saturday, September 03, 2005

FRUCTOSE

Mice who drank fructose-sweetened water gain 63% more than with sucrose-sweetened soft drink

Mice give a fructose drink gained 63 percent more weight in two months than mice given either water, a sucrose-sweetened soft drink or a diet soft drink according to a fascinating new study from the German Institute of Human Nutrition in Nuthetal, Germany. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Sat, Sep 03, 2005 2:41 am | [2] comments

Saturday, June 11, 2005

UNDERREPORTING OF CALORIE INTAKE

15-year-old girls eat nearly 50% more calories than they say they do

Girls underreport the amount of calories they consume by an average of 12 percent at the age of 10-years-old, by 23 percent at the age of 12-years-old, and by 32 percent at the age of 15-years-old according to a recent study by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Sat, Jun 11, 2005 12:45 am | [0] comments

Tuesday, September 21, 2004

Low-cal, low-fat diet that contains sugar causes a weight loss of 5 percent

People eating a low-calorie, low-fat diet that contained sugar, to make it more palatable, lost an average of 5.2 percent of their bodyweight in three months according to a new study from England. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Sep 21, 2004 2:25 pm | [0] comments

Saturday, April 17, 2004

Higher sugar intake after gastric surgery predicts greater weight loss

TWO YEARS AFTER GASTRIC SURGERY patients consuming the most sugar had lost the most weight according to a recent study. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Sat, Apr 17, 2004 3:50 pm | [0] comments

Tuesday, April 06, 2004

Sugar associated with lower body weight

Believe it or not, higher sugar intake is associated with lower body mass index and lower body fat according to epidemiological data. There is also an inverse relationship between sugar and fat intake. In other words, the more sugar people eat, the less fat they eat. Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Admin2 on Tue, Apr 06, 2004 7:28 am | [0] comments

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