fatnews.com

SEARCH

Thursday, March 05, 2020

NIACIN

Niacin lowers risk of heart attack or dying from a heart attack by an average of 25%

Niacin lowers the risk of a major coronary event (heart attack, death from heart attack or coronary bypass surgery) by an average of 25% according to a meta-analysis of eleven (11) studies which involved a total of 6545 people.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Mar 05, 2020 6:47 am | [0] comments

NIACIN

Niacin lowers risk of stroke by an average of 26%

Niacin lowers the risk of a stroke by an average of 26% according to a meta-analysis of eleven (11) studies which involved a total of 6545 people.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Mar 05, 2020 6:40 am | [0] comments

NIACIN

Niacin raises HDL by an average of 20%

Niacin raises HDL cholesterol levels by an average of 20% notes a paper on niacin.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Mar 05, 2020 6:37 am | [0] comments

NIACIN

Niacin lowers LDL by an average of 16%

Niacin lowers LDL cholesterol levels by an average of 16% notes a paper on niacin.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Mar 05, 2020 6:34 am | [0] comments

NIACIN

Niacin lowers triglycerides by an average of 20%

Niacin lowers triglyceride levels by an average of 20% notes a paper on niacin.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Mar 05, 2020 6:31 am | [0] comments

NIACIN

Niacin lowers C-reactive protein (CPR) by an average of 24%

Extended-release niacin (1500 to 2000 mg per day) lowers levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) by an average of 24% in people starting with higher levels of Lp(a)—starting levels of 92 mg/dL versus 54 mg/dL—according to a study from Russia.

Elevated levels of C-reative protein—above 2 mg/dL—are associated with an increased risk of heart and stroke as noted by the Mayo Clinic.

Note: I prefer immediate-release niacin to extended-release niacin. In the 1980’s there were reports of some liver problems with extended-release niacin, and earlier studies showing benefits of niacin used immediate-release niacin, not extended-release.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Thu, Mar 05, 2020 6:20 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, February 12, 2020

CHOLESTEROL & HEART ATTACK RISK

Elevate cholesterol has almost nothing to do with heart attack risk notes Prof. Timothy Noakes

“There is so much evidence to show that it is not cholesterol [that increases heart attack risk],” notes Prof. Timothy Noakes, MD, DSc, PhD in an interview that he did on a Fat & Furious podcast.

“Cholesterol is a terribly poor predictor of heart attack risk.”

“It is so pathetic…”

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Feb 12, 2020 9:32 am | [0] comments

Saturday, January 25, 2020

LDL CHOLESTEROL

LDL levels less than 300 mg/dL have no value in predicting coronary heart disease

“Unless LDL levels are… 300 mg/dL or higher, they have no value, in isolation, in predicting those individuals at risk of [coronary heart disease].”
— William Castelli, 1996; as noted in this 35-second video clip of cardiologist Dr. Aseem Malhotra.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sat, Jan 25, 2020 11:02 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, January 01, 2020

LDL CHOLESTEROL

Higher LDL levels protect against death following a heart attack or heart failure

“Our data support a protective role for [higher LDL levels] against all-cause mortality following incident [heart attack] and [heart failure],” concludes a new study from researchers at the Mayo Clinic.

LDL levels above 130 mg/dL were most protective.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Jan 01, 2020 9:48 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, October 23, 2019

CHOLESTEROL & THE RISK OF DEATH

Higher cholesterol, 11-23% lower risk of death in men, 8-28% lower risk in women

Higher cholesterol levels were associated with an 11-23% lower risk of death in men, and an 8-28% lower risk of death in women compared with men and women with cholesterol levels of less than 193 mg/dL according to the HUNT 2 study from Norway.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Oct 23, 2019 3:24 pm | [0] comments

Friday, July 05, 2019

LDL AND BLEEDING IN THE BRAIN

LDL of 50-69 mg per deciliter associated with 1.7 times greater risk of bleeding in the brain

Compared to people with LDL cholesterol levels of 70-99 mg per deciliter, people with LDL levels of 50-69 mg per deciliter have a 1.7 times greater risk of bleeding in the brain according to a study by researchers from Pennsylvania State University.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Jul 05, 2019 12:24 pm | [0] comments

LDL AND BLEEDING IN THE BRAIN

LDL of less than 50 mg per deciliter associated with 2.7 times greater risk of bleeding in the brain

Compared to people with LDL cholesterol levels of 70-99 mg per deciliter, people with LDL levels of less than 50 mg per deciliter have a 2.7 times greater risk of bleeding in the brain according to a study by researchers from Pennsylvania State University.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Jul 05, 2019 12:02 pm | [0] comments

Saturday, March 23, 2019

CHOLESTEROL & STROKE

People with low cholesterol who had a stroke were 88% more likely to die over 5 years

The study found that people with low cholesterol levels — below 200 mg/dL — who had an ischemic stroke were 88% more likely to die over the next 5 years compared with people who had higher cholesterol levels — above 200 mg/dL.

To say this the other way, people who had an ischemic stroke who had higher cholesterol levels — above 200 mg/dL — were 47% less likely to die over the next 5 years than people with lower cholesterol levels — below 200 mg/dL.

Why would you ever give a statin or any other cholesterol-lowering drug to anyone who has had a stroke after seeing the results of this study?

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sat, Mar 23, 2019 2:59 pm | [0] comments

Friday, September 21, 2018

CHOLESTEROL & HEART DISEASE

People whose cholesterol levels decrease are at an INCREASED risk of death!

For years we have been told that lower cholesterol levels are associated with a lower risk of death.

But it turns out that this is not true!

Research shows that the exact opposite is true!

When cholesterol levels fall, people are at a greater risk of death, not a lower risk of death!

This is noted a new review paper by independent researchers Uffe Ravnskov, MD, PhD, author of The Cholesterol Myths, Dr. Malcolm Kendrick, author of The Great Cholesterol Con, and other independent researchers.

In the review paper, they note:

“If high [total cholesterol] was the major cause of CVD [cardiovascular disease], people with high [total cholesterol] should have a higher risk of dying from CVD.

“The hypothesis that high [total cholesterol] causes CVD [cardiovascular disease] was introduced in the 1960s by the authors of the Framingham Heart Study.

“However, in their 30-year follow-up study published in 1987, the authors reported that ‘For each 1 mg/dl drop in [total cholesterol] per year, there was an eleven percent [11%] increase in coronary and total mortality’.

“Three years later the American Heart Association and the US National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute published a joint summary [8] concluding “a one percent reduction in an individual’s [total cholesterol] results in an approximate two percent reduction in CHD [coronary heart disease] risk”.

“The authors fraudulently referred to the Framingham publication to support this widely quoted false conclusion.”

In other words, they’ve been lying to us for 30 years!

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Sep 21, 2018 11:50 pm | [0] comments

CHOLESTEROL & HEART DISEASE

There is no association between total cholesterol and the degree of atherosclerosis

There is no association between total cholesterol and the degree of atherosclerosis notes a new review paper by independent researchers Uffe Ravnskov, MD, PhD, author of The Cholesterol Myths, Dr. Malcolm Kendrick, author of The Great Cholesterol Con, and others.

“If high [total cholesterol] causes atherosclerosis, people with high [total cholesterol] should have more atherosclerosis than people with low [total cholesterol]. In 1936 Landé and Sperry found that corrected for age, unselected people with low [total cholesterol] were just as atherosclerotic as people with high [total cholesterol]. Since then their seminal observation has been confirmed in at least a dozen studies,” they note.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Sep 21, 2018 12:02 pm | [0] comments

Saturday, May 19, 2018

CHOLESTEROL

Men with cholesterol of less than 160 mg/dL 60% MORE likely to die vs 160-199 mg/dL over 5-13 years

Men whose total cholesterol levels were less than 160 mg/dL were 60% MORE likely to die during the next 5-13 years compared with men whose cholesterol levels were 160-199 mg/dL according to a 2008 meta-analysis of 5 studies in Japan which included a total of more than 173,000 people.

In other words, having LOW cholesterol levels was associated with a dramatically HIGHER risk of death.

Based on this data, do you think that it is a mistake to try and lower your cholesterol levels as low as possible as recommended by the “experts”?

Yes, of course it is!

It is a big mistake!

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sat, May 19, 2018 11:55 am | [0] comments

CHOLESTEROL

Men with total cholesterol of 200-239 mg/dL 18% LESS likely to die vs 160-199 mg/dL over 5-13 years

Men whose total cholesterol levels were 200-239 mg/dL were 18% LESS likely to die during the next 5-13 years compared with men whose cholesterol levels were 160-199 mg/dL according to a 2008 meta-analysis of 5 studies in Japan which included a total of more than 173,000 people.

In other words, having HIGHER cholesterol levels was associated with a LOWER risk of death.

Or to say this in reverse, having HIGHER cholesterol levels was associated with a LOWER risk of death.

Why would I want to lower my cholesterol levels?

I don’t!

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sat, May 19, 2018 11:50 am | [0] comments

CHOLESTEROL

Men with cholesterol of 240 mg/dL or greater 24% LESS likely to die vs 160-199 mg/dL over 5-13 years

Men whose total cholesterol levels were 240 mg/dL or greater were 24% LESS likely to die during the next 5-13 years compared with men whose cholesterol levels were 160-199 mg/dL according to a 2008 meta-analysis of 5 studies in Japan which included a total of more than 173,000 people.

In other words, having HIGHER cholesterol levels was associated with a LOWER risk of death.

Or to say this in reverse, having HIGHER cholesterol levels was associated with a LOWER risk of death.

Why would I want to lower my cholesterol levels?

I don’t!

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sat, May 19, 2018 11:45 am | [0] comments

CHOLESTEROL

Women with cholesterol of less than 160 mg/dL 41% MORE likely to die over 5-13 years

Women whose total cholesterol levels were less than 160 mg/dL were 41% MORE likely to die during the next 5-13 years compared with women whose cholesterol levels were 160-199 mg/dL according to a 2008 meta-analysis of 5 studies in Japan which included a total of more than 173,000 people.

Data from this meta-analysis suggests that elevated cholesterol levels do NOT increase a woman’s risk of death, but if cholesterol levels are LOW — below 160 mg/dL — there is a dramatic (41%) INCREASED risk of death.

Should a woman try to lower her cholesterol levels?

No, I don’t think so!

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sat, May 19, 2018 11:40 am | [0] comments

CHOLESTEROL

Women with total cholesterol of 200-239 mg/dL NO MORE likely to die vs 160-199 mg/dL over 5-13 years

Women whose total cholesterol levels were 200-239 mg/dL were NO MORE likely to die during the next 5-13 years compared with women whose cholesterol levels were 160-199 mg/dL according to a 2008 meta-analysis of 5 studies in Japan which included a total of more than 173,000 people.

Data from this meta-analysis suggests that elevated cholesterol levels do NOT increase a woman’s risk of death, but if cholesterol levels are LOW — below 160 mg/dL — there is a dramatic (41%) INCREASED risk of death.

Should a woman try to lower her cholesterol levels?

No, I don’t think so!

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sat, May 19, 2018 11:35 am | [0] comments

CHOLESTEROL

Women with total cholesterol of 240 mg/dL or greater were NO MORE likely to die vs 160-199 mg/dL

Women whose total cholesterol levels were 240 mg/dL or GREATER were NO MORE likely to die during the next 5-13 years compared with women whose cholesterol levels were 160-199 mg/dL according to a 2008 meta-analysis of 5 studies in Japan.

Data from this meta-analysis suggests that elevated cholesterol levels do NOT increase a woman’s risk of death, but if cholesterol levels are LOW — below 160 mg/dL — there is a dramatic (41%) INCREASED risk of death.

Should a woman try to lower her cholesterol levels?

No, I don’t think so!

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sat, May 19, 2018 11:30 am | [0] comments

Sunday, May 13, 2018

NIACIN

Niacin lowers Lp(a) by an average of 28%

Extended-release niacin (1500 to 2000 mg per day) lowers levels of Lp(a) by an average of 28% in people starting with higher levels of Lp(a)—starting levels of 92 mg/dL versus 54 mg/dL—according to a study from Russia.

Elevated levels of Lp(a) (above 50 mg/dL) are associated with an increased risk of heart attack and stroke according to the Lipoprotein a Foundation.

Note: I prefer immediate-release niacin to extended-release niacin. In the 1980’s there were reports of some liver problems with extended-release niacin, and earlier studies showing benefits of niacin used immediate-release niacin, not extended-release.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sun, May 13, 2018 6:25 am | [0] comments

Tuesday, May 08, 2018

PARKINSON’S

Low cholesterol levels associated with 2.3 times greater risk of Parkinson’s disease

The one-third of people with the highest cholesterol levels were 57% less likely to get Parkinson’s during a 20-year follow-up compared to the one-third of people with the lowest cholesterol levels according to a recent study.

The one-third of people with the middle cholesterol levels were 44% less likely to get Parkinson’s compared to the one-third of people with the lowest cholesterol levels.

The say this the other way, the one-third of people with the lowest cholesterol levels were 2.3 times more likely to get Parkinson’s than the one-third of people with the highest cholesterol levels, and they were 1.8 times more likely to get Parkinson’s compared to the one-third of people with the middle cholesterol levels.

“Our study suggests that lowering cholesterol unnecessarily actually may harm the brain,”  Xuemei Huang, MD, PhD lead author of the study was quoted as saying.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Tue, May 08, 2018 6:59 am | [0] comments

Friday, May 04, 2018

CHOLESTEROL & ALZHEIMER’S

Each 100 mg of dietary cholesterol intake associated with a 10% lower risk of Alzheimer’s

Each 100 mg intake of cholesterol per day was associated with a 10% lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease, although this difference was not quite statistically significant, but almost. (Close enough for me.)

Each 0.5 eggs eaten per day was associated with a 11% lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease, although this difference was not quite statistically significant, but almost. (Close enough for me.)

Half an egg contains very roughly 100 mg of cholesterol.

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, May 04, 2018 10:01 am | [0] comments

Saturday, March 11, 2017

HDL CHOLESTEROL

Men with low HDL levels of 30 mg/dl or below were 81% more likely to die from cardiovascular disease

Men with low HDL cholesterol levels of 30 mg/dl or less were 81% more likely to die from cardiovascular disease during an average follow-up of 4.9 years than men with HDL levels of 41-50 mg/dl according to a 2016 study from Canada.

The study found that HDL levels that were either too high (>90 mg/dl) or too low (≤30 mg/dl) were associated with an increased risk of death when compared to men with more moderate HDL levels (41-80 mg/dl).

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sat, Mar 11, 2017 12:57 pm | [0] comments

HDL CHOLESTEROL

Men with low HDL levels of 30 mg/dl were 61% more likely to die from cancer over 4.9 years

Men with low HDL cholesterol levels of 30 mg/dl or less were 61% times more likely to die from cancer during an average follow-up of 4.9 years than men with HDL levels of 41-50 mg/dl according to a 2016 study from Canada.

The study found that HDL levels that were either too high (>90 mg/dl) or too low (≤30 mg/dl) were associated with an increased risk of death when compared to men and women with more moderate HDL levels (41-80 mg/dl).

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sat, Mar 11, 2017 12:51 pm | [0] comments

HDL CHOLESTEROL

Men with low HDL levels of 30 mg/dl were 2X more likely to die from non-cancer and non-CVD causes

Men with low HDL cholesterol levels of 30 mg/dl or less were 2 times more likely to die from non-cancer and non-cardiovascular causes during an average follow-up of 4.9 years than men with HDL levels of 41-50 mg/dl according to a 2016 study from Canada.

The study found that HDL levels that were either too high (>90 mg/dl) or too low (≤30 mg/dl) were associated with an increased risk of death when compared to men and women with more moderate HDL levels (41-80 mg/dl).

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sat, Mar 11, 2017 12:44 pm | [0] comments

HDL CHOLESTEROL

Women with low HDL levels of 30 mg/dl were 2.3X more likely to die from cardiovascular disease

Women with low HDL cholesterol levels of 30 mg/dl or less were 2.3 times more likely to die from cardiovascular disease during an average follow-up of 4.9 years than women with HDL levels of 51-60 mg/dl according to a 2016 study from Canada.

The study found that HDL levels that were either too high (>90 mg/dl) or too low (≤30 mg/dl) were associated with an increased risk of death when compared to men and women with more moderate HDL levels (41-80 mg/dl).

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sat, Mar 11, 2017 12:30 pm | [0] comments

HDL CHOLESTEROL

Women with low HDL levels of 30 mg/dl were 2X more likely to die from cancer over 4.9 years

Women with low HDL cholesterol levels of 30 mg/dl or less were 2 times more likely to die from cancer during an average follow-up of 4.9 years than women with HDL levels of 51-60 mg/dl according to a 2016 study from Canada.

The study found that HDL levels that were either too high (>90 mg/dl) or too low (≤30 mg/dl) were associated with an increased risk of death when compared to men and women with more moderate HDL levels (41-80 mg/dl).

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sat, Mar 11, 2017 12:21 pm | [0] comments

HDL CHOLESTEROL

Women with low HDL levels of 30 mg/dl were 2.9X more likely to die from non-cancer & non-CVD causes

Women with low HDL cholesterol levels of 30 mg/dl or less were 2.9 times more likely to die from non-cancer and non-cardiovascular causes during an average follow-up of 4.9 years than women with HDL levels of 51-60 mg/dl according to a 2016 study from Canada.

The study found that HDL levels that were either too high (>90 mg/dl) or too low (≤30 mg/dl) were associated with an increased risk of death when compared to men and women with more moderate HDL levels (41-80 mg/dl).

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Sat, Mar 11, 2017 12:10 pm | [0] comments

Friday, March 10, 2017

HDL CHOLESTEROL

Men with high HDL levels above 90 mg/dl were 68% more likely to die over next 4.9 years

Men with high HDL cholesterol levels of greater than 90 mg/dl were 68% more likely to die (from any cause) during an average follow-up of 4.9 years than men with HDL levels of 51-60 mg/dl according to a 2016 study from Canada.

(12.1 per 1,000 men with HDL levels greater than 90 mg/dl died versus 7.2 men with HDL levels of 51-60 mg/dl. 12.1 divided by 7.2 equals 1.68.)

The study found that HDL levels that were either too high (>90 mg/dl) or too low (≤30 mg/dl) were associated with an increased risk of death when compared to men with more moderate HDL levels (41-80 mg/dl).

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Mar 10, 2017 12:23 pm | [0] comments

HDL CHOLESTEROL

Men with high HDL levels above 90 mg/dl were 47% more likely to die from cardiovascular disease

Men with high HDL cholesterol levels of greater than 90 mg/dl were 47% more likely to die from cardiovascular disease during an average follow-up of 4.9 years than men with HDL levels of 51-60 mg/dl according to a 2016 study from Canada.

(2.8 per 1,000 men with HDL levels greater than 90 mg/dl died from cardiovascular disease versus 1.9 men with HDL levels of 51-60 mg/dl. 2.8 divided by 1.9 equals 1.47.)

The study found that HDL levels that were either too high (>90 mg/dl) or too low (≤30 mg/dl) were associated with an increased risk of death when compared to men with more moderate HDL levels (41-80 mg/dl).

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Mar 10, 2017 12:16 pm | [0] comments

HDL CHOLESTEROL

Men with high HDL levels above 90 mg/dl were 36% more likely to die from cancer over 4.9 years

Men with high HDL cholesterol levels of greater than 90 mg/dl were 36% more likely to die from cancer during an average follow-up of 4.9 years than men with HDL levels of 51-60 mg/dl according to a 2016 study from Canada.

(3.4 per 1,000 men with HDL levels greater than 90 mg/dl died from cardiovascular disease versus 2.5 men with HDL levels of 51-60 mg/dl. 3.4 divided by 2.5 equals 1.36.)

The study found that HDL levels that were either too high (>90 mg/dl) or too low (≤30 mg/dl) were associated with an increased risk of death when compared to men with more moderate HDL levels (41-80 mg/dl).

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Mar 10, 2017 12:10 pm | [0] comments

HDL CHOLESTEROL

Men with high HDL levels above 90 mg/dl were 2.2X more likely to die from other causes over 5 years

Men with high HDL cholesterol levels of greater than 90 mg/dl were 2.2 times more likely to die from causes other than dying from cancer or cardiovascular disease (119% more likely) during an average follow-up of 4.9 years than men with HDL levels of 51-60 mg/dl according to a 2016 study from Canada.

(5.9 per 1,000 men with HDL levels greater than 90 mg/dl died from cardiovascular disease versus 2.7 men with HDL levels of 51-60 mg/dl. 5.9 divided by 2.7 equals 2.19.)

The study found that HDL levels that were either too high (>90 mg/dl) or too low (≤30 mg/dl) were associated with an increased risk of death when compared to men with more moderate HDL levels (41-80 mg/dl).

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Mar 10, 2017 12:02 pm | [0] comments

HDL CHOLESTEROL

Women with high HDL levels above 90 mg/dl were 21% more likely to die over next 4.9 years

Women with high HDL cholesterol levels of greater than 90 mg/dl were 21% more likely to die (from any cause) during an average follow-up of 4.9 years than women with HDL levels of 61-70 mg/dl according to a 2016 study from Canada.

(6.8 per 1,000 women with HDL levels greater than 90 mg/dl died versus 5.6 women with HDL levels of 51-60 mg/dl. 12.1 divided by 7.2 equals 1.68.)

The study found that HDL levels that were either too high (>90 mg/dl) or too low (≤30 mg/dl) were associated with an increased risk of death when compared to women with more moderate HDL levels (41-80 mg/dl).

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Mar 10, 2017 11:55 am | [0] comments

HDL CHOLESTEROL

Women with high HDL levels above 90 mg/dl were 0% more likely to die from cardiovascular disease

Women with high HDL cholesterol levels of greater than 90 mg/dl were 0% more likely to die from cardiovascular disease during an average follow-up of 4.9 years than women with HDL levels of 61-70 mg/dl according to a 2016 study from Canada.

(1.6 per 1,000 women with HDL levels greater than 90 mg/dl died versus 1.6 women with HDL levels of 61-70 mg/dl. 1.6 divided by 1.6 equals 1.0.)

The study found that HDL levels that were either too high (>90 mg/dl) or too low (≤30 mg/dl) were associated with an increased risk of death when compared to women with more moderate HDL levels (41-80 mg/dl).

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Mar 10, 2017 11:50 am | [0] comments

HDL CHOLESTEROL

Women with high HDL levels above 90 mg/dl were 10% more likely to die from cancer over 4.9 years

Women with high HDL cholesterol levels of greater than 90 mg/dl were 100% more likely to die from cancer during an average follow-up of 4.9 years than women with HDL levels of 61-70 mg/dl according to a 2016 study from Canada.

(2.2 per 1,000 women with HDL levels greater than 90 mg/dl died versus 2.0 women with HDL levels of 61-70 mg/dl. 2.2 divided by 2.0 equals 1.10.)

The study found that HDL levels that were either too high (>90 mg/dl) or too low (≤30 mg/dl) were associated with an increased risk of death when compared to women with more moderate HDL levels (41-80 mg/dl).

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Mar 10, 2017 11:44 am | [0] comments

HDL CHOLESTEROL

Women with high HDL levels above 90 mg/dl were 50% more likely to die from other causes over 5 years

Women with high HDL cholesterol levels of greater than 90 mg/dl were 50% more likely to die from causes other than dying from cancer or cardiovascular disease during an average follow-up of 4.9 years than women with HDL levels of 61-70 mg/dl according to a 2016 study from Canada.

(3.0 per 1,000 women with HDL levels greater than 90 mg/dl died versus 2.0 women with HDL levels of 61-70 mg/dl. 3.0 divided by 2.0 equals 1.50.)

The study found that HDL levels that were either too high (>90 mg/dl) or too low (≤30 mg/dl) were associated with an increased risk of death when compared to women with more moderate HDL levels (41-80 mg/dl).

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Mar 10, 2017 11:42 am | [0] comments

HDL CHOLESTEROL

Women with high HDL levels above 90 mg/dl were 50% more likely to die from other causes over 5 years

Women with high HDL cholesterol levels of greater than 90 mg/dl were 50% times more likely to die from other causes other than dying from cancer or cardiovascular disease during an average follow-up of 4.9 years than women with HDL levels of 61-70 mg/dl according to a 2016 study from Canada.

(3.0 per 1,000 women with HDL levels greater than 90 mg/dl died from cardiovascular disease versus 2.0 women with HDL levels of 61-70 mg/dl. 3.0 divided by 2.0 equals 1.5.)

The study found that HDL levels that were either too high (>90 mg/dl) or too low (≤30 mg/dl) were associated with an increased risk of death when compared to women with more moderate HDL levels (41-80 mg/dl).

Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Fri, Mar 10, 2017 11:41 am | [0] comments

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

STATINS

While statin use increased 68% (1999-2005), heart attacks increased 16%, strokes 45%!

Statin use among US adults increased dramatically from 1999 to 2005 from 8% of people surveyed to 13.4% of people surveyed, a relative increase of 68%.

How much do you think this reduced heart attacks, strokes and coronary heart disease?

Would you be surprised to learn that during this time that:

Heart attacks increased from 3.4% to 3.7%, a relative increase of 16%!

Strokes increased from 2.0% to 2.9%, a relative increase of 45%!

Coronary heart disease increased from 2.8% to 3.7%, a relative increase of 32%!

Type 2 diabetes increased from 7.8% to 10.3%, a relative increase of 32%!

People with one or more of these conditions increased from 13.4% to 16%, a relative increase of 19%!

Do you believe that statins reduce the risk of heart attack, stroke and death?

I do not.

The results of the study mentioned above suggests the exact opposite.

Below is more evidence that statins are not the wonderful, life-saving drugs that we have been led to believe, but instead the exact opposite: that statins are causing harm.
Read the entire article | Email this article
Posted by Larry Hobbs on Wed, Sep 21, 2016 12:12 pm | [0] comments

Page 1 of 3. Go to page  1 2 3 >  Follow @fatnews

QUICKLINKS AND VIEW OPITONS

  • Categories of Articles
  • Summary View
  • Headline View
  • Archive of Quotes
  • Contact Us
  • QUOTE OF THE DAY

    Books by Larry Hobbs available on Amazon

    Book cover for The Case Against Statins

    © Copyright 2003-2021 - Larry Hobbs - All Rights Reserved.