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    Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load: Sports Bars


    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Friday, August 20, 2004 1:10 am Email this article
    Below is a table with the glycemic index and glycemic loads of sports bars.

    High glycemic index foods increase calorie intake by 50 to 80 percent when compared to medium- and low-glycemic index foods according to one study.

    Low glycemic index foods reduce calorie intake and are associated with lower body weights.

    Some researchers believe that low-carbohydrate diets work because they are low glycemic index and low glycemic load foods.

    Glycemic index is how quickly a given amount of food raises blood sugar levels relative to pure glucose (blood sugar).

    Glycemic load is a ranking of how much a standard serving of food raises your blood sugar. Glycemic load is calculated by multiplying the amount of carbohydrate in a food by the glycemic index and dividing by 100. Glycemic load of a food is a better tool than the glycemic index value of a food when evaluating the foods you eat.

    A more complete description of glycemic index and glycemic load can be found here.

         

    Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load of Sports Bars

     
    SPORTS BARS
    Glycemic
      Index
    Glycemic
        Load
       
    Serving
      size
    Available
      carbohydrate
     
    (Glucose = 100)
    (per serving)
    grams
    grams per serving
        569 Power Bar (Powerfood Inc, Berkeley, CA, USA)
            Power Bar, chocolate 58 ± 5
            Power Bar, chocolate   53
            Average of 2 studies 56 ± 324 6542
        570 Ironman PR bar, chocolate (PR Nutrition, San Diego, CA, USA)   3910 6526

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