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  • Obesity increases the risk of kidney stones by one-third in men and doubles the risk in women


    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Tuesday, April 05, 2005 7:54 am Email this article
    Obesity increases the risk of kidney stones in men by 33 percent, and by 90 percent in younger women and 109 percent in older women according to a new study from Harvard University in Boston, Massachusetts. Obesity is BMI greater than 30

    Obesity is defined as having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more.

    Men more than 220 lbs vs less than 150 lbs: 44% greater risk

    Men who weighed more than 220 pounds were 44 percent more likely to develop a kidney stone than men who weighed less than 150 pounds.

    Woen more than 220 lbs vs less than 150 lbs: 89-92% greater risk

    Women who weighed more than 220 pounds were 89-92 percent more likely to develop a kidney stone than women who weighed less than 150 pounds. (Eighty-nine percent for younger women, 92 percent for older women.)

    Men who gained more than 35 lbs: 39% greater risk

    Men who gained more than 35 pounds since the age of 21, were 39 percent more likely to develop kidney stones compared to men whose weight did not change.

    Women who gained more than 35 lbs: 70-82% greater risk

    Women who gained more than 35 pounds since the age of 21, were 70-82 percent more likely to develop kidney stones compared to women whose weight did not change. (Seventy percent for younger women, 82 percent for older women.)

    Subjects: 46,000 men, 94,000 older women, 102,000 younger women

    The study analyzed data from 45,988 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, aged 40- to 75-years-old at the beginning of the study, plus 93,758 older women, 34- to 59-years-old at the beginning of the study, from the Nurses’ Health Study I, plus 101,877 younger women, 27- to 44-years-old at the beginning of the study, from the Nurses’ Health Study II.

    Conclusion: Obesity and weight gain increases the risk of kidney stones, women even more than men

    “Obesity and weight gain increase the risk of kidney stone formation,” the authors concluded. “The magnitude of the increased risk may be greater in women than in men.”

    REFERENCE

    Taylor E, Stampfer M, Curhan GC. Obesity, weight gain, and the risk of kidney stones. JAMA. 2005 Jan 26, 293(4):455-62.

    AUTHOR’S CONTACT INFORMATION

    E. Taylor
    Channing Laboratory
    Department of Medicine
    Brigham and Women’s Hospital
    Harvard Medical School
    Boston, Mass 02115, USA
    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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