fatnews.com Home page  >  Article | Previous article | Next article

SEARCH

QUICKLINKS AND VIEW OPITONS

  • Categories of Articles
  • Summary View
  • Headline View
  • Archive of Quotes
  • Contact Us
  • Follow @fatnews

    Eating a salad before a meal reduces calorie intake at the meal by 64 to 145 calories


    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Thursday, June 10, 2010 10:05 am Email this article
    Women who ate a salad before a meal reduced the calories eaten at that meal by by 7 to 17 percent according to a recent study by Barbara J. Rolls, professor of Nutritional Sciences at Pennsylvania State University in University Park, Pennsylvania, USA. Small, low-calorie salad reduced intake by 64 calories or 7%

    Eating a small, 10.5 ounce, salad containing 50 calories before a meal reduced calorie intake at the meal by 64 calories or 7 percent.

    Large, low-calorie salad reduced intake by 107 calories or 12%

    Eating a large, 21 ounce, low-calorie salad containing 100 calories before a meal reduced calorie intake at the meal by 107 calories or 12 percent.

    Small, high-calorie salad increased intake by 71 calories or 8%

    Eating a small, 10.5 ounce, higher-calorie salad containing 200 calories—made with more cheese and more dressing—before a meal increased calorie intake at the meal by 71 calories or 8 percent.

    Large, higher-calorie salad increased intake by 145 calories or 17%

    Eating a large, 21 ounce, higher-calorie salad containing 400 calories—made with more cheese and more dressing—before a meal increased calorie intake at the meal by 145 calories or 17 percent.

    Conclusion

    “Eating a large portion of a first course low in energy density [low calories for the amount of food eaten] increases fullness while adding few calories, so that intake is reduce during the entire meal,” Rolls concluded.

    Limit high-calorie additions to 100 calories

    “A large portion of water-rich ingredients should be used as a base, and the amount of high-calorie additions should be limited to keep the energy content around 100 [calories],” Rolls notes.

    Conclusion: Eat more water-rich foods that are low in calories

    “‘Eat less’ is not always the best advice. For foods very low in energy density, such as water-rich vegetables, larger portions increase satiety and reduce meal energy intake,” Rolls continues.

    “As the energy density of a food increases, portion control becomes important to limit overall energy intake.”

    “Consuming a large portion of a low-energy-dense food at the start of a meal may be an effective strategy for weight management.”

    Subjects: 42 women

    The study consisted of 42 women who were in good health and between the ages of 19- and 45-years-old, with an average age of 26, and a body mass index of 18 to 35, with an average of 23.7 which is normal weight.

    They ate lunch in the laboratory once a week for seven weeks.

    REFERENCE

    Rolls B, Roe L, Meengs J. Salad and satiety: energy density and portion size of a first-course salad affect energy intake at lunch. J Am Diet Assoc. 2004 Oct, 104(10):1570-76.

    AUTHOR’S CONTACT INFORMATION

    Barbara J. Rolls
    Department of Nutritional Sciences
    Pennsylvania State University
    University Park, PA, USA
    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    Articles on the same subject can be found here:


    COMMENTS

    Please feel free to share your comments about this article.


    Name:

    Email:

    Comments:

    Please enter the word you see in the image below:


    Remember my personal information

    Notify me of follow-up comments?



    © Copyright 2003-2021 - Larry Hobbs - All Rights Reserved.