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    Men lose more weight on high-protein, low-carb diet than high-protein, medium-carb : 13.9 vs 10 lbs


    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Wednesday, January 30, 2008 1:13 pm Email this article
    Men eat less and lose more weight on a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet than a high-protein, medium-carbohydrate diet according to a new study from researchers at the Division of Obesity and Metabolic Health at the Rowett Research Institute in Aberdeen, Scotland.

    Those fed a diet containing 30 percent protein and only 4 percent carbohydrates ate 9 percent fewer calories without any dietary restrictions -- 3035 calories per day versus 3328 -- and lost more weight during the one-month study -- 13.9 pounds versus 10 pounds.

    Body Weight

    Body weight decreased from 238 pounds to 224 on the low-carb diet vs 228 on the medium-carb diet

    Body weight of the men eating the high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet dropped from an average of 237.6 pounds to 223.7 pounds.

    Body weight of the men eating the high-protein, medium-carbohydrate dropped from an average of 238 pounds to 228.4 pounds.

     

    Subjects

    Subjects : 20 obese men

    The study involved 20 obese men, 20- to 65-years-old.

    All men ate both diets for a month.

    First they were assigned to one diet for a month, followed by three days of maintenance. Then they were assigned to the other diet.

    The men lived at the research center for two-months, but were allowed to leave to go to work.

     

    High-protein, Low-carbohydrate Diet Composition

    Diet Composition : High-protein, low-carbohydrate—30% protein, 66% fat, 4% carbs

    All meals and snacks on the high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet consisted of:

     

    High-protein, Medium-carbohydrate Diet Composition

    Diet Composition : High-protein, medium-carbohydrate—30% protein, 35% fat, 35% carbs

    All meals and snacks on the high-protein, medium-carbohydrate meal consisted of:

     

    Same Calorie Density for Both Diets

    Both diets had the same amount of calories per ounce of food

    The calorie density of both diets, that is the number of calories per ounce of food, was the same for both diets to make sure that this would not affect the results of the study.

     

    Conclusion #1

    Conclusion : Eating a low-carb diet reduced calorie intake by 293 calories per day versus medium-carbohydrate diet

    Eating a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet reduced calorie intake more than a high-protein, medium-carbohydrate diet. And remember, calorie intake was not restricted.

    “The current data suggest that reducing the carbohydrate content between the two high-protein diets resulted in an energy intake decrease of… (294 [kilocalories per day]) and a corresponding effect on the negative energy balance,” the researchers noted.

     

    Conclusion #1

    Conclusion : Eating a high-protein, low-carb diet reduced calorie intake by 40 percent per day

    They also noted that when these men started on either of the high-protein diets after being on a maintenance diet for three days, their calorie intake decreased by an average of 40 percent.

    “A large decrease in energy intake (average: 40%) was observed between the maintenance diet and the two high-protein diets, a finding that is similar to responses observed previously,” the researchers also noted.

     

    Conclusion #3

    Conclusion : Low-carb diets cause more weight loss than low-fat diets, at least in the short-term

    “There is growing evidence that weight loss, at least in the short term, is significantly greater in obese persons following low-carbohydrate diets than in those following low-fat diets

     

    Conclusion #4

    Conclusion : Low-carb diets cause more weight loss than low-fat diets, at least in the short-term

    “In conclusion, the low-carbohydrate component of the high-protein regimen affects subjective motivation to eat, and volunteers feel less hungry and consume less energy, at least in the short term.

    “This regimen appears to reduce calorie intake without increased hunger, and, therefore, it promotes compliance.

    “The current evidence would support the use of such diets, in the short term at least, as a measure to reduce mortality and morbidity [ill health] in obese subjects who would benefit from a modest weight loss.”

    REFERENCE

    Johnstone A, Horgan G, Murison S, Bremner D, Lobley G. Effects of a high-protein ketogenic diet on hunger, appetite, and weight loss in obese men feeding ad libitum. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jan, 87(1):44-55.

    AUTHOR’S CONTACT INFORMATION

    Alexandra M. Johnstone
    Division of Obesity and Metabolic Health and Biomathematics and Statistics Scotland
    Rowett Research Institute
    Aberdeen, UK AB21 9SB
    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

     

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