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  • Potassium bicarbonate reduced my blood pressure by about 20 points to 121/72 mm Hg


    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Sunday, August 10, 2014 9:55 am Email this article
    Potassium bicarbonate reduced my blood pressure by about 20 points from roughly 140/70-something to 121/72 mm Hg.
    Potassium chloride is the more commonly-recommended form, however, the research suggests to me that potassium bicarbonate is superior to potassium chloride for many reasons. Here's why.

    Potassium Intake

    We used to consume a lot more potassium

    It has been estimated that in Paleolithic Times, humans used to consume…
    “... in excess of 280 meq (10,900 mg)” of potassium per day,
    compared to modern humans who consume
    “about 80 meq (3100 mg) of potassium per day.”

     

    Sodium Intake

    We used to consume a lot less sodium

    It has been estimated that in Paleolithic Times, humans used to consume
    “about 29 meq (670 mg)” of sodium per day, compared to modern humans who consume
    “between 100-300 meq (2300-6900 mg)” of sodium per day.

     

    Potassium and Sodium Ratio

    The ratio of potassium-to-sodium has changed 30-fold

    In other words, we used to consume
    • 3-4 times more potassium than we do today,
    (10,900 mg vs 3100 mg potassium per day) and
    • today, we consume 3 to 10 times more sodium than we used to.
    (2300-6900 mg vs 670 mg sodium per day).

    The ratio of potassium-to-sodium intake has changed 30-fold, from Paleolithic Times until now, from 10 parts Potassium to 1 part Sodium to 1 part Potassium to 3 parts Sodium (10 part Potassium to 30 parts Sodium)

     

    Bicarbonate intake

    We used to consume more bicarbonate or bicarbonate-generating salts

    Most of the potassium in food is in the form of acid-neutralizing “bicarbonate-generating” organic acid salts ( like potassium citrate and potassium malate. )

     

    Chloride intake

    We used to consume a lot less chloride

    Whereas most of the sodium in food is in the form of sodium chloride (salt).

    Therefore, since we used to consume a lot more potassium, we also used to get a lot more bicarbonate.

    Therefore, since we used to consume and a lot less sodium, we also used to get and a lot less chloride.

     

    Our Genes

    Our genes evolved to handle the way we used to eat

    Our genes evolved to handle the way we used to eat, that is consuming
    • a lot more potassium
    • a lot more bicarbonate
    • a lot less sodium
    • a lot less chloride

     

    Our Diet

    Our diet is ‘profoundly mismatched’ to our genes, and it gets worse as we get older

    Therefore, our diet is “profoundly mismatched” to our genes, and the extent of this mismatch “increases with age”.

     

    Too much Sodium and Chloride, Not enough potassium and bicarbonate

    Our diet is ‘profoundly mismatched’ to our genes, and it gets worse as we get older

    As a consequence of this mismatch, we are “not only overloaded with sodium and chloride” but we are also “deficient in potassium and bicarbonate” the authors of the paper note.

     

    Potassium Chloride vs Potassium Bicarbonate

    Our diet is ‘profoundly mismatched’ to our genes, and it gets worse as we get older

    Potassium Bicarbonate reduced blood pressure in stroke-prone, spontaneously hypertensive rats, whereas Potassium Chloride did NOT.

    There were also NO strokes (0%) in the rats given Potassium Bicarbonate, whereas 35% of rats given Potassium Chloride had strokes.

    Blood pressure in these stroke-prone, spontaneously hypertensive rats was:
    • 44/35 mm Hg lower w/ Pot. Bicarb.
    • 248/179 mm Hg Potassium Chloride
    • 226/161 mm Hg Control (rat chow)
    • 204/144 mm Hg Potassium Bicarb.

    REFERENCE

    Frassetto L, Morris RJ, Sellmeyer D, Todd K, Sebastian A. Diet, evolution and aging—the pathophysiologic effects of the post-agricultural inversion of the potassium-to-sodium and base-to-chloride ratios in the human diet. Eur J Nutr. 2001 Oct, 40(5):200-13.

    AUTHOR’S CONTACT INFORMATION

    R. Curtis Morris Jr., M.D.
    Department of Medicine
    University of California, San Francisco
    1291 Moffitt Hospital, Box 0126
    San Francisco, CA 94143-0126
    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    Lynda A. Frassetto, M.D
    Professor, Division of Nephrology
    University of California, San Francisco
    521 Parnassus Avenue, C429
    Box 0126
    San Francisco, CA 94143-0126
    (415) 476-6143 phone
    (415) 476-0986 fax
    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    Anthony Sebastian, MD
    Professor of Medicine
    University of California, San Francisco
    505 Parnassus Avenue, M1202
    Box 0126
    San Francisco, CA, 94143-0126 USA
    Phone: 415-476-4336
    Fax: 415-358-5953
    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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