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  • Disruption of our circadian rhythm prevents natural rise and fall in blood pressure in some people


    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Monday, December 13, 2010 12:38 pm Email this article
    Disruption of our natural circadian rhythm, called chronodisruption, can interrupt the normal rise and fall in blood pressure that occurs from day to night according to a recent paper by researchers at the University of Murcia in Murcia, Spain.

    "It has been shown that night-time [blood pressure] is the best predictor of stroke and myocardial infarction risk," the authors note.

    People whose blood pressure does not fall at night is more common among shift workers and elderly the paper notes.

    This suggests that disruption of circadian rhythm may play increase the risk of heart attack and stroke.
    Rise and Fall in Daily Blood Pressure

    Disruptions in circadian rhythms prevent the natural rise in fall in blood pressure in some people

    “In people with normal blood pressure (BP) and uncomplicated essential hypertension, [blood pressure] declines to its lowest levels during night-time sleep, rises abruptly with morning awakening and attains a maximum during diurnal [daytime] activity.

    “It has been shown that night-time [blood pressure] is the best predictor of stroke and myocardial infarction risk.

    “Thus, hypertensive patients with a normal reduction in nocturnal [blood pressure] (dipper) had a relative hazard of cardiovascular mortality similar to that in non-dipper normotensives.

    [In other words, people whose blood pressure was high during the day, but it dropped at night had roughly the same risk of dying from cardiovascular disease as people who had normal blood pressure during the day whose blood pressure did not fall at night.]

    “It is noteworthy that the non-dipper circadian pattern is more frequent among shift workers and elderly people,” the authors note.

    REFERENCE

    Garaulet M, Ordovas J, Madrid J. The chronobiology, etiology and pathophysiology of obesity. Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Jun 22, published on-line.

    AUTHOR’S CONTACT INFORMATION

    Dr M Garaulet
    Faculty of Biology, Department of Physiology
    University of Murcia, Faculty of Biology
    Campus of Espinardo
    Murcia 30100, Spain
    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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