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  • People eating 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day lived 3.1 years longer


    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Thursday, June 14, 2018 8:31 am Email this article

    People who consumed one-half (0.5) serving of fruits and vegetables per day lived an average of one (1) years longer than those who never consumed fruits and vegetables according to a recent study which followed 38,221 men and 33,485 women who were 45- to 83-years-old for an average of 13 years.

    People who consumed one (1) serving of fruits and vegetables per day lived an average of 1.7 years longer than those who never consumed fruits and vegetables.

    People who consumed 2 servings of fruits and vegetables per day lived an average of 2.5 years longer than those who never consumed fruits and vegetables.

    People who consumed 3 servings of fruits and vegetables per day lived an average of 2.8 years longer than those who never consumed fruits and vegetables.

    People who consumed 4 servings of fruits and vegetables per day lived an average of 3 years longer than those who never consumed fruits and vegetables.

    People who consumed 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day lived an average of 3.1 years longer than those who never consumed fruits and vegetables.


    Those who never consumed fruits and vegetables were 53% more likely to die during the 13 year follow-up than those who consumed 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day.

    Conclusion

    Conclusion: Consumption of fruits and vegetables is associated with living longer

    “We found that daily consumption of [fruits and vegetables] was associated with a substantially longer survival and lower rate of overall mortality,” the authors note.

    Conclusion: Consumption of less than 5 servings of fruits and vegetables is associated with dying sooner

    “Levels of consumption [of less than] 5 [servings of fruits and vegetables per day] were associated with progressively shorter survival [that is, dying sooner], with a 3 [year] shorter survival and a 53% higher mortality rate for those who did not consume [fruits and vegetables].

    “Compared with an [fruit and vegetable] consumption of 5 [servings per day], higher levels of consumption were not associated with longer survival or a decreased rate of mortality.”

    In other words, the maximum benefit was seen with consumption of 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day, and consuming more than this did not seem to provide additional benefits.

    Conclusion: Benefits were seen with one serving of fruit and up to 3 servings of vegetables per day

    “Benefits from eating fruit was observed at a consumption of merely 1 [serving per day], whereas vegetable consumption was associated with a progressively longer survival up to 3 [servings per day].”

    “In summary, the findings from this prospective study indicate that [fruit and vegetable] consumption [less than] 5 [servings per day] is associated with progressively shorter survival and higher mortality rates.

    “[Fruit and vegetable] consumption [more than] 5 [servings per day] does not provide considerable added benefits with respect to survival.”

    Adjusted for numerous things

    Adjusted for age, sex, BMI, total physical activity, alcohol consumption, smoking status and pack-years, education level, and total energy intake

    “Models were adjusted for age at baseline, sex, BMI, total physical activity, alcohol consumption, smoking status and pack-years, education level, and total energy intake,” they note.

    Study Subjects

    People from the population-based Cohort of Swedish Men and the Swedish Mammography Cohort

    “Participants from the population-based Cohort of Swedish Men and the Swedish Mammography Cohort were combined in this study,” the paper notes.

    “Briefly, participants in the Cohort of Swedish Men were recruited in 1997–1998, when all men who were 45–79 y of age and resided in Vastmanland and Orebro counties (central Sweden) received an invitation to participate in the study.”

    “A self-administrated questionnaire was used to collect information on diet, alcohol consumption, education, body weight, height, physical activity, smoking habits, and other lifestyle factors.”

    “A total of 48,850 men returned the questionnaire.”

    “The population-based Swedish Mammography Cohort was established between 1987 and 1990 when women born between 1914 and 1948 and residing in Va ̈stmanland and Uppsala counties (central Sweden) were recruited.”

    “Participants completed a questionnaire with questions regarding diet, alcohol consumption, education, body weight, and height.

    “In the late fall of 1997, women who were still alive and residing in the study area received a second questionnaire that was expanded to include information regarding smoking status, physical activity, and other lifestyle factors.”

    Reference

    Bellavia A, Larsson SC, Bottai M, Wolk A, and Orsini N. Fruit and vegetable consumption and all-cause mortality: a dose-response analysis. Am J Clin Nutr, 2013 Aug; 98(2): 454-459.

    The paper is posted here:

    http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/98/2/454.long

    Author’s Contact Info

    Nicola Orsini
    Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology
    Institute of Environmental Medicine
    Karolinska Institutet
    PO Box, SE-171 77
    Stockholm, Sweden
    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)




     

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