fatnews.com Fatnews Bitchute Channel Link Home page  >  Article | Previous article | Next article

SEARCH

QUICKLINKS AND VIEW OPITONS

  • Categories of Articles
  • Summary View
  • Headline View
  • Archive of Quotes
  • Contact Us
  • NIH Scientists who recommend drugs have often been paid by drug companies, The presentation as a PDF


    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Monday, June 15, 2009 1:02 pm Email this article

    A PDF version of this entire presentation can be downloaded by clicking here.

    Many scientists from the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) have been given money or stock or stock options from drug companies.

    This was kept secret for years.

    This according to a great article from the Los Angeles Times from 2004.

    Hi, this is Larry Hobbs @ FatNews.com.

    For example 8 out of 9 scientists on the National Cholesterol Education Program’s panel which give national guidelines for who should take cholesterol-lowering drugs have been paid by the drug companies selling these drugs.

    My guess is that the same is probably true for blood pressure, diabetes, and psychiatric conditions, and probably many other conditions where drugs are recommended.
    I nd this unconscionable.
    To me, this is selling your soul for money.

    Dr. H. Bryan Brewer, Jr., a scientist at the NIH involved in new guidelines for cholesterol.

    Dr. H. Bryan Brewer, Jr. also wrote a positive paper on the stain called Crestor.

    Dr. H. Bryan Brewer, Jr. was paid $114,000 from companies making cholesterol drugs.

    At least 530 scientists at the NIH have taken money, stock or stock options from biomedical companies in the previous 5 yrs.

    Dr. P. Trey Sunderland III took $508,050 from Pfizer.

    Without telling people he taken $508,000 from Pfizer, Dr. P. Trey Sunderland III endorsed an Alzheimer’s drug from Pfizer during a nationally televised presentation at the NIH.

    The NIH allowed most scientists to file confidential income disclosure forms.

    In other words, the NIH kept these payments a SECRET.

    “… most of the payments had been kept secret from Congress, the public and… doctors.”

    If there was nothing wrong with it, why would they keep it a secret?

    The NIH did NOT comply with Congress’s request for information about payments.

    At least 130 “consulting deals” did NOT have approval from the NIH.

    Many medical conferences put on for doctors, which featured NIH scientists as speakers, did NOT reveal that these scientists had taken money from these companies.

    In other words, both doctors and the public have been deceived.

    This is also true for national guidelines on cholesterol put out by the National Cholesterol Education Program.

    The drug companies tell doctors…

    “These are guidelines from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).”

    … but they never tell the doctors that these NIH scientists have been paid by the drug companies.

    Dr. Brewer praised Crestor in a medical journal, but NEVER mentioned he had been paid by the company.

    Dr. Brewer wrote a positive article about the cholesterol drug Crestor, but NEVER mentioned a potentially lethal side effect.

    A scientist in search of the truth, would NEVER do this.

    Dr. Brewer wrote “No cases of rhabdomyolysis occurred in patients receiving [Crestor] at 10 to 40” mg.

    But there were 8 cases of rhabdomyolysis reported in studies of Crestor.

    But Dr. Brewer NEVER mentioned this.

    Dr. Brewer NEVER warned doctors about this potentially LETHAL side effect of Crestor.

    One of the cases of rhabdomyolysis was in someone given only 10 mg of Crestor.

    But wait a minute d

    Dr. Brewer wrote…

    “No cases of rhabdomyolysis occurred in patients receiving [Crestor] at 10 to 40” mg.

    This was a lie.

    Dr. Brewer, a cholesterol expert at the NIH, lied to us.

    The makers of Crestor routinely give copies of Dr. Brewer’s positive article about Crestor to doctors.

    In the first year on the market, there were at least 78 cases of rhabdomyolysis in patients given Crestor.

    And two patients given Crestor DIED.

    “Crestor has an inferior evidence base supporting it’s safe use.”—Lancet, Aug 2003
    ,

    Dr. Brewer paid $83,000 by Lipid Sciences, which was developing a cholesterol drug.

    Dr. Brewer was then to be paid $125,000 per year plus stock options.

    Dr. Brewer held 411,927 stock options.

    This means if the stock price went $1 above his strike price, Dr. Brewer would make $411,000.

    If the stock price went $10 above his strike price, Dr. Brewer would make $4 million.

    If the stock price went $100 above his strike price, Dr. Brewer would make $40 million.

    Do you think this may have affected what he said?

    Dr. Brewer also took $55,000 from Pfizer, the makers of the cholesterol drug Lipitor.

    Payments to Dr. Brewer were kept secret by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

    Dr. Brewer also served on the National Cholesterol Education Program’s panel which issues national guidelines on
    cholesterol and who should take cholesterol drugs.

    8 of the 9 authors of these cholesterol guidelines had been paid by the drug companies selling these drugs s

    … but they NEVER mentioned this in their report on cholesterol.

    These guidelines on cholesterol should NOT be trusted.
    —Dr. David L. Brown, chief of cardiology at State University of New York at Stony Brook

    I agree completely.

    Dr. Brewers salary at the NIH was $187,305.

    In 2003, there were 3.5 billion prescriptions written in the U.S.
    35 million, according to NIH estimates.

    These prescription drugs were given to 129 million Americans.

    As of 2003, drug sales in the U.S. topped $231 billion per year.

    Over a four year period, drug companies donated $41 million to federal politicians.

    In the late-1980’s, the NIH started allowing some NIH scientists to accept money from these companies.

    In November 1995, the head of the NIH started allowing many more scientists to accept money, stock and stocks options…

    … but this was kept SECRET for 8 years, from November 1995 until December 2003, when made public by the Los Angeles Times.

    Starting in November 1995, the head of the NIH:

    1.) Lifted all limits on the amount of money scientist could accept from companies

    2.) Lifted the ban against taking STOCK from these companies

    3.) Lifted the ban against taking STOCK OPTIONS from these companies

    4.) Allowed TOP LEADERS at the NIH to make deals with drug companies

    And also allowed more and more of these deals to remain SECRET.

    This reminds me of a corrupt third world government, where everyone who is part of the corruption, thinks it’s OK.

    In a random sample, 40% of outside payments had NOT been approved or accounted for.

    My guess is that money from drug companies has inuenced recommendations regarding Cholesterol, Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar, Psychiatric conditions, and probably many other conditions.

    I also strongly urge you to watch the clips of Melody Petersen,author of the book “Our Daily Meds” when she was interviewed by Bill Moyers.

    You can nd them searching YouTube for “Our Daily Meds” or you can search YouTube for “Melody Petersen”.

    It’s eye-opening.

    REFERENCE

    David Willman. The National Institutes of Health: Public Servant or Private Marketer? Los Angles Times, December 24, 2004.

    Articles on the same subject can be found here:


    COMMENTS

    Please feel free to share your comments about this article.


    Name:

    Email:

    Comments:

    Please enter the word you see in the image below:


    Remember my personal information

    Notify me of follow-up comments?



    © Copyright 2003-2021 - Larry Hobbs - All Rights Reserved.