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  • Breast Cancer: Being 20-29 percent overweight increases risk of dying from by 16 percent


    Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Wednesday, July 28, 2004 3:45 am Email this article
    Being 20-29 percent over ideal weight increases a woman's risk of dying from breast cancer by 16 percent according to a study done by the American Cancer Society involving 750,000 people determined the risk of dying from individual diseases.

    However, this study did not exclude people with cancer—who also tend to be thin—from the study. This means that the risk associated with being thin is probably too high in this study.

    Other studies have found that obesity decreases the risk of premenopausal breast cancer, but increase postmenopausal breast cancer.

    The following table summarizes their findings.

                                                 

    Relative Risk of Dying from Prostate Cancer

    Compared to People of Ideal Weight

    Based on a study of 750,000 people (Lew, 1979)

    Sex
    20% or more under ideal weight
    11-20% under ideal weight
    Within 10% of ideal weight
    10-19% over ideal weight
    20-29% over ideal weight30-39% over ideal weightMore than 40 % over ideal weight

    Males

     
    2%
    -8%
    0%
    -10%
    +37%
    +33%
    +29%

    REFERENCE

    Lew E. Mortality experience among anesthesiologists, 1954-1976. Anesthesiology. 1979 Sep, 51(3):195-99.

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